Tags: Fortnite

Join the Fortnite Crew to give Epic recurring revenue

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Epic Games has announced a subscription service for Fortnite. For $12 a month, the Fortnite Crew offer will give players access to each new battle pass for as long as they keep their subscription going. Along with that pass, members will net 1,000 units of in-game funny money and an exclusive outfit so everyone knows you’re one of the cool (rich) kids.

Epic had previously surveyed players a few weeks ago about whether or not they wanted such an offer, and it seems the responses were positive. At the very least, the survey results must not have put Epic off their track. Although the battle pass model is sometimes seen as a “soft” version of a subscription, an actual recurring credit charge is more coveted by most businesses.

The Fortnite Crew begins on December 2nd.

Movie streaming in Fortnite is going to be a thing

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Get used to it, Gramps. The kids love Fortnite and it’s the hub of their entertainment world. Back in the good old days, the youngsters would watch videos on YouTube, but that’s long gone. Fortnite is the place to go if you want to capture the youth market. A pre-movie event for Star Wars Episode IX: The Rise of Skywalker was only available in Fortnite. Christopher Nolan’s upcoming Tenet trailer debuted in Fortnite. Celebrities play Fortnite to show how hip and cool they are.

Now, Fortnite will stream three movies in its Party Royale island. Depending on where you live, you’ll get one of three Christopher Nolan films streamed in your region on June 26th. The movies are The Prestige, Batman Begins, and Inception. Unfortunately, US residents get Inception, while Canada gets the superior The Prestige. The event will mark the first time a full movie is played in Fortnite. Attend so you can tell your grandchildren you were there too.

Google says Fortnite has to pay them like everyone else

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Google has refused to waive their standard fee for Fortnite’s in-game purchases. According to The Verge, Epic asked Google for an exemption or reduction in their cut to have Fortnite listed on Google’s Play store for the Android platform. Google, not surprisingly, told Epic to take a hike. The tech giant pointed out that Epic apparently pays Apple the same rate to be listed on the official Apple iOS store, and that their portion of revenue is necessary to maintain their distribution and support costs. Epic says it’s high time for the industry to change.

We have asked that Google not enforce its publicly stated expectation that products distributed through Google Play use Google’s payment service for in-app purchase. We believe this form of tying of a mandatory payment service with a 30% fee is illegal in the case of a distribution platform with over 50% market share.

Fortnite is currently not available in Google’s Play store for Android platform. It has to be manually loaded onto Android tablets and phones via Epic’s store.

Fortnite Chapter 2 isn’t just an update. It’s a revelation.

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For a couple of days, Fortnite was unavailable to players. If you had logged in, you’d have just seen a black hole with no option to play. Of course, everyone assumed something big was coming, but when compared to Fortnite’s previous events, yesterday’s Chapter 2 release is quite literally a game-changer in a lot of ways.

The update’s features are numerous and the mechanical, as well as qualitative, differences from the previous version of Fortnite exert influence over almost every facet of the gameplay. There’s a completely new map in which bodies of water aren’t just obstacles. Thanks to the addition of speedy watercraft, lakes and rivers are actually highways to other parts of the map. Weapon tables have been reorganized and streamlined to make arsenals less finicky and obtuse. The XP system has been overhauled to provide easier progression with medals and challenges. The game’s community is still trying to figure out what it all means for their meta discussion.

Oh, but I did say “almost” everything is different. The one thing that hasn’t changed is that the 14-year old with lightning-quick construction menu mastery will still beat you. Sorry. It is still, at its core, Fortnite.

So, you got banned from Fortnite

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Even as Fortnite gears up for another Avengers marketing event, Epic Games is dealing with rampant cheating. The company announced over 1,200 bans handed out to cheaters in the first week of the World Cup Online open tournament. Punishments were given to players sharing and boosting accounts, switching regions, teaming up to trade kills, and even using software modifications. In one strange case, a professional eSports player was tattled on by the person that sold him the cheating app. Cap would give you detention for that.

The Fortnite World Cup Online open tournament will continue until June 16th. The finals will occur on the 26th through the 28th of July.

Will Fortnite be as popular without dancing?

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Terrence “2 Milly” Ferguson, a popular New York rapper, is suing Epic Games over the inclusion of a dance in Fortnite. Ferguson alleges that the “Swipe It” emote in Fortnite is an unauthorized copy of the “Milly Rock” dance from his 2014 music video. Fortnite, like many games with a cosmetic element, cashes in on culture by turning memes and pop references into emotes, gestures, and skins. Ferguson is not the first person to complain about the lack of credit or compensation from Epic, but he is probably the most high-profile personality to file papers. “Scrubs” actor Donald Faison similarly accused the studio of swiping his moves as seen in this clip from the show.

Fortnite has drawn ire from many dance creators because of the massive amounts of money involved, as well as the sting of having the dances “appropriated” by the game. For example, many younger Fortnite players call this the “Fortnite Dance” due to it being one of the original emotes, despite it being more properly known as “The Floss” by its creator.

You can copyright “pantomimes and choreographic works” but it’s unclear if the Milly Rock, The Shoot Dance, or any of the other moves used by Epic would qualify under these rules due to the length of the routines.

The newest ESPN cover athlete is a Fortnite streamer

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This is Tyler “Ninja” Blevins. He’s going to be featured on the cover of the October edition of ESPN The Magazine. A first for the publication. If you watch Fortnite gameplay streams, Ninja’s work is inescapable. He plays with celebrities, random people, other famous gamers, and of course, by himself. In April, he broke Twitch records by hitting over 600,000 concurrent viewers. The next month, Ninja broke his own record. By his estimate, he makes “close to” a million dollars a month from donations, subscriptions, and sponsorship deals. To an audience of a certain age, he is the next Michael Jordan or Joe Montana.

Fortnite on Android dodges Google’s store

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Fortnite will soon be available on Android mobile devices, but not through Google Play. Instead, iOS-less players will need to “sideload” Epic’s proprietary software to install and play the game. Speaking to Eurogamer, Epic’s Tim Sweeney confirmed that one of the reasons for not using Google’s app store was a financial concern.

Avoiding the 30 per cent “store tax” is a part of Epic’s motivation. It’s a high cost in a world where game developers’ 70 per cent must cover all the cost of developing, operating, and supporting their games.

Epic admitted that they would’ve done the same thing on Apple’s devices if they were able to load their software without using the curated (and revenue-sharing) method. Epic has not announced a date for Fortnite’s Android launch.

How much money is in Fortnite esports? All the money.

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Epic is putting up $100 million to fund the esport prize pool for Fortnite Battle Royale. That’s $100 million straight from the company’s own funds, rather than crowdfunded by fans. How crazy large is that prize pool? It’s more than the total for the ten most popular games of 2017 combined. It’s epic money. According to the studio, the funding is being done with an eye towards fun and inclusivity, although it’s not clear yet what that really means for the competitive events.

People either love Fortnite or Drake a lot

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What happens when a music superstar with 36 million Twitter followers hops into a session of Fortnite with one of the most popular videogame streamers in the world? You blow out all the records for Twitch viewership. Late last night renaissance man Drake popped into a game with Tyler “Ninja” Blevins and hit a peak of 607,000 Twitch viewers, easily surpassing the previous high of 388,000. Drake performed well, telling Blevins at one point that he’d only got into the game a “month or two” ago.

If that wasn’t enough of a pop-culture confluence, by the end of the night, Pittsburgh Steelers receiver John “JuJu” Smith-Schuster, rapper Travis Scott, and Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom joined the game. It all sounds so amazing that one might think it a prearranged marketing stunt, except for the way the group’s in-game meetup was plagued with technical issues for a good part of the stream. (Drake’s PlayStation tag was apparently too full.) Most of the issues were eventually resolved thanks to judicious use of cross-play between the PlayStation 4 and PC versions of the game. Basically, this may have been the best advertisement for Fortnite ever.

You can check out an archive of the gaming session here.

This is how you sell Fortnite in Korea

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Everything about this commercial is precious. This advertisement may mark the official launch of Epic’s Fornite in South Korea or it might be hawking bubblegum disco ramen. It’s tough to tell. All I know is that at about 25 seconds in, the main actor does a great job replicating the in-game “floss” dance move.

The Battle Royale between Battlegrounds and Fortnite has started

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Bluehole, the publisher of PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds, is not pleased with Epic’s foray into the same arena. While Fortnite Battle Royale is going free-to-play, Bluehole is pondering their relationship with Epic’s Unreal Engine 4. In an interview with GamesIndustry, Bluehole’s Chang Han Kim pointed out that while they pay Epic for their UE4 engine license, Epic has suddenly become a competitor, including the use of Battlegrounds in their marketing.

“We have also noticed that Epic Games references PUBG in the promotion of Fortnite to their community and in communications with the press. This was never discussed with us and we don’t feel that it’s right.”

Whatever the outcome, it’s likely that Fortnite won’t be the last copycat of Battlegrounds. To date, Bluehole’s multiplayer phenomenon has sold over 11 million units on PC alone.