Archive for September, 2010

, | Games Games podcasts

Scott Lantz, the poster formerly known as Hiro Antagonist, announces a cool iPhone game in development, teaches me a fancy new word, and even manages to change the score on my Civilization V review!

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Don’t let anyone tell you about this podcast! Except for the 3×3 of reflection moments in movies. It starts at the 54-minute mark.

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, | Games Games podcasts

Me and nixon66, whose name is Brian, talk Star Control II, which gives me the chance to gloat about one of my prized possessions. We also talk a bit of Etrian Odyssey III and Lord of the Rings Online. And –spoiler! — I win the trivia contest this time. Not fairly, but I win anyway.

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The devil in Devil doesn’t just torment people in elevators. He also makes people on podcasts yell at each other. Then we do a 3×3 of movies that traumatized us as kids, starting at the 1:02:30 mark.

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, | Games Games podcasts

Jon Rowe is six foot four. Dwarves are short. This podcast unites them! Listen as we discuss Dwarf Fortress. Also, be sure to place your bets for how long it will take Jon to move to Los Angeles.

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Does Paul Anderson’s script live up to Kelly Wand’s synopsis? Find out on our Resident Evil: Afterlife podcast. Then listen to this week’s 3×3 for the best scenes shot through windows, which begins at the 1:07 mark.

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, | Games Games podcasts

Bill Dungsroman — his actual name is Henry — needs no introduction. So I won’t bother. But I will promise that if you listen to this podcast, you’ll not only hear some high falutin’ talk about “art games”, but you’ll also get to listen in while he tries to subtly take a Secret Phone Call.

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It’s our most multicultural podcast, but it will spoil important plot points in Machete. If you haven’t seen the movie yet, fast forward to this week’s 3×3 at the 57-minute mark for our choice of best opening credit sequences.

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