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Thread: Help: How many megapixels is this monitor? (2560 x 1600 at 60 Hz)

  1. #1
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    Help: How many megapixels is this monitor? (2560 x 1600 at 60 Hz)

    Need to buy a monitor for work that is at least 3 megapixels



    Looking at this monitor:

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/4070/d...-inch-flagship

    2560 x 1600 at 60 Hz

    how many MP is it? help please, thanks!

  2. #2
    New Romantic
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    2560 x 1600 = 4,096,000 = 4 mega (million) pixels

  3. #3
    How To Go
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    a mega pixel is one million pixels.

    Multiply the horizontal and vertical pixel dimensions to get the total pixel count.

    Divide that by one million.

    That's a very strange way to specify a computer resolution. The metric for computer monitor resolutions is the horizontal and vertical pixel count, not megapixels.

  4. #4
    Mad Chester
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    Maybe it's for xrays?

  5. #5
    Spinning Toe
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    Yeah, my guess is that there is some specific kind of image, that happens to be 3 megapixels, that they would like to display at 100% and still see the entire image.

  6. #6
    New Romantic
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    Then the dimensions of the picture itself are gonna matter.

    Even if the monitor can display 4 million pixels, unless the image is of the same aspect ratio as the monitor, and you aren't using any screen real estate to display other stuff like GUI elements on the edges, then you're gonna end up either scaling the image or cropping it.

  7. #7
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    Yeah it is for xrays. Radiologists go by megapixel count. I am looking for 2 good monitors for xrays (MRI and CT scans use much lower resolutions) -- got any suggestions?

    mammography uses 5 MP as a minimum

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDel View Post
    I am looking for 2 good monitors for xrays
    I think we use Planar, but I'll check tomorrow.

    EDIT: Yes, they are Planars.
    Last edited by magnet; 05-10-2012 at 12:07 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDel View Post
    Yeah it is for xrays. Radiologists go by megapixel count. I am looking for 2 good monitors for xrays (MRI and CT scans use much lower resolutions) -- got any suggestions?

    mammography uses 5 MP as a minimum
    Sure, but, if your goal is ultimately getting a 1:1 mapping between your image resolution and your monitor resolution so that you don't have to zoom in or pan around an image when it's shown on your screen at actual size, you're going to have to tell us the exact dimensions of your images.

    As previously mentioned, the monitors you are looking at are widescreen. Are your images widescreen? We don't think so. If the height dimension of your photo is larger than 1600 pixels, that Dell will still chop off an edge when you view it at actual size. Is that okay?

  10. #10
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    I take it this kind of question wasn't on the MCAT?

  11. #11
    Social Worker Ephraim's Avatar
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    I've spent a bit of time looking at the medical imaging monitors at the hospital where my brother works. They're NECs with 3 megapixel image capability, and they were widescreen monitors but rotated into portrait orientation. I don't think the medical professionals looking at the monitors mind panning and zooming, and in fact they seem to like being able to focus in on specific areas.

    From what I can see, the goal is usually not 1:1 pixel mapping in order to take in all of a single image in a glance without resizing, but rather the clearest possible image at the highest possible zoom.

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    Oh, no no no. Radiologists will most definitely mind if they are forced to pan every image.

    DrDel, if you are really looking into monitors for radiologic diagnosis, then you should familiarize yourself with the ACR practice guidelines, starting on page 5. There's a lot more to it than resolution, monitors also have specific requirements for luminance, etc.

    Bear in mind that all devices used in medicine must be FDA-approved for that purpose. Radiology viewstations are included.
    Last edited by magnet; 05-10-2012 at 12:25 PM.

  13. #13
    Social Worker Ephraim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnet View Post
    Oh, no no no. Radiologists will most definitely mind if they are forced to pan every image.

    DrDel, if you are really looking into monitors for radiologic diagnosis, then you should familiarize yourself with the ACR practice guidelines, starting on page 5. There's a lot more to it than resolution, monitors also have specific requirements for luminance, etc.

    Bear in mind that all devices used in medicine must be FDA-approved for that purpose. Radiology viewstations are included.
    Good to know. My (very limited) experience with imaging is from a research, not clinical standpoint. I'm pretty sure that DrDel is in Canada, so I don't think FDA requirements are a concern. Health Canada and provincial health ministry rules and regs may be a different story.

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