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View Full Version : Are there any great newscasters nowadays?



theblackw0lf
06-13-2003, 09:32 PM
Seeing David Brinkley pass away just made me realize how so many of our newscasters nowadays are lacking. So are there any great ones today? I know I personally like Ted Koppel but I'm always on the lookout for more

bmulligan
06-13-2003, 10:16 PM
No, there are no great newscasters because there is no news, it's all editorial.

Robert Sharp
06-14-2003, 03:19 PM
I agree that we mostly get editorializing nowadays, even when it is in the guise of supposed "unbiased" coverage. However, I do think there are some good opinion spewers out there, mostly in sports news. I like Mike Wilbon for instance. Sometimes Dan Pompei says interesting things (but not always).

If you want decent news coverage, I recommend BBC news. If you have satellite you can see it on BBCAmerica (which is a fantastic channel in many ways, though it is starting to decay into the Changing Rooms/Ground Force channel, which is sad).

Jason McCullough
06-14-2003, 06:24 PM
Editorial? Are you watching the same news I am? The actual news content of television news is rapidly approach zero.

bmulligan
06-14-2003, 07:59 PM
You must not be watching the same BBC news I am. Their leftist slant is more than obvious, especially during the US mission in Iraq. I think that 'The National', a Candian broadcast, is the most objective news program on television, followed by the Jim Lehrer News Hour.

Troy S Goodfellow
06-14-2003, 08:16 PM
Even Brinkley stopped being a true newscaster once he moved to the Sunday morning circuit - and it was his idea for round-table discussions that led, gradually, to the up-the-ante shout-fest that typifies a lot of American TV journalism. Has anybody ever learned anything from watching The McLaughlin Group or Crossfire? Not that I blame Brinkley for the continuing public life of Pat Buchanan, but TV news has been more about TV than news ever since anchormen had to have a Camel cigarette burning on their desk.

My argument against network news isn't its editorializing - I'm smart enough to figure things out if I want to. It's the brevity of it. Brinkley-Huntley was the first half-hour news program, I think, but the modern "news you can use" approach fills that precious half-hour with dubious medical advice, wild weather shots and water skiing squirrels.

I miss Canadian radio more than the TV - CBC TV is fine, but the night they spent half the newscast talking about the death of one of their former announcers I realized they value themselves far too highly. And they have their own biases - much less subtle - on federalism and social issues. I happen to share many of these biases, so it doesn't bug me too much.

I just thank God that I live in a city with a first class newspaper. Robert Sharp is right on Michael Wilbon - great, great sportswriter. And a very entertaining TV personality.

Troy

Jakub
06-14-2003, 08:33 PM
Peter Mansbridge of the CBC is OK, but the guy on Global National news (in Canada), is really good.

I wish I knew his name... Lloyd something or other?

Troy S Goodfellow
06-14-2003, 08:37 PM
Peter Mansbridge of the CBC is OK, but the guy on Global National news (in Canada), is really good.

I wish I knew his name... Lloyd something or other?

Mansbridge is good. Nice guy, too. With a little less self-importance, Hanomansing might grow into Mansbridge.

The good thing about CBC is that they have a deep bench. Just when you think they can't find another appealing on-air personality, they do. The legend is that they found Mansbridge announcing flights at a Manitoba airport.

Troy

Jason McCullough
06-14-2003, 08:47 PM
Oh, yeah, the BBC still reports actual news. Biased or not, there's no water skiing squirrels.

Jakub
06-14-2003, 08:48 PM
Hanomansing will never make it as a top-flight newscaster. Well, not for me anyway. He reminds me too much of a rich chinese immigrant kid I know. Like he could never understand why everybody else doesn't drive around in an Acura NSX.

Creole Ned
06-15-2003, 03:54 PM
Peter Mansbridge of the CBC is OK, but the guy on Global National news (in Canada), is really good.

I wish I knew his name... Lloyd something or other?

[announcer voice] CTV National News with Lloyd Robertson. [/announcer voice]

MarchHare
06-15-2003, 07:11 PM
Hanomansing will never make it as a top-flight newscaster. Well, not for me anyway. He reminds me too much of a rich chinese immigrant kid I know. Like he could never understand why everybody else doesn't drive around in an Acura NSX.


Except he grew up in Sackville, NB...hardly a town where rich kids live (except for students at Mount Allison).

Idar Thorvaldsen
06-15-2003, 07:21 PM
You must not be watching the same BBC news I am. Their leftist slant is more than obvious, especially during the US mission in Iraq.
Was it a blessed mission, yea, divinely ordained? Because you know, those leftists are often Godless Communists.


Oh, yeah, the BBC still reports actual news. Biased or not, there's no water skiing squirrels.
Oh, I miss BBC World so very, very much. I don't know about newscasters, but Tim Sebastian is (or was, if he's not still on) a great interviewer. He shows how dreadful Larry King is. On the whole, they have pretty good newscasters; they even deviate from the script in interviews on occasion.

Troy S Goodfellow
06-15-2003, 07:40 PM
Hanomansing will never make it as a top-flight newscaster. Well, not for me anyway. He reminds me too much of a rich chinese immigrant kid I know. Like he could never understand why everybody else doesn't drive around in an Acura NSX.


Except he grew up in Sackville, NB...hardly a town where rich kids live (except for students at Mount Allison).

He was a legend in Atlantic Canadian debating circles - about a dozen years earlier than I was much less than a legend in these circles.

Not sure of his family class origins. A South Asian family in Sackville could as likely be a shopkeeper as a professor.

Troy

Jakub
06-16-2003, 05:23 AM
Hanomansing will never make it as a top-flight newscaster. Well, not for me anyway. He reminds me too much of a rich chinese immigrant kid I know. Like he could never understand why everybody else doesn't drive around in an Acura NSX.


Except he grew up in Sackville, NB...hardly a town where rich kids live (except for students at Mount Allison).
I'm not saying he is a rich kid, he just exudes a feeling that he couldn't relate to his audience if his life depended on it.

Jakub
06-16-2003, 05:24 AM
He was a legend in Atlantic Canadian debating circles - about a dozen years earlier than I was much less than a legend in these circles.
Maybe that's why he comes off as so smug sometimes.

Raife
06-16-2003, 08:50 AM
Seeing David Brinkley pass away just made me realize how so many of our newscasters nowadays are lacking. So are there any great ones today? I know I personally like Ted Koppel but I'm always on the lookout for more
http://www.nakednews.com/design/logo.gif (http://www.nakednews.com)

Kalle
06-16-2003, 09:30 AM
http://www.nakednews.com/design/logo.gif (http://www.nakednews.com)

Crap, the moment I saw this thread I thought "Naked News", only to find out that you had beaten me to it by a mere hour.

Where's superman to spin the globe backwards and reverse time when you need him?

Troy S Goodfellow
06-16-2003, 10:02 AM
He was a legend in Atlantic Canadian debating circles - about a dozen years earlier than I was much less than a legend in these circles.
Maybe that's why he comes off as so smug sometimes.

I'm not sure if the smugness comes from his success at this arcane art or contributed to this success. Most the great debaters who cleaned my clock had an air of invincibility about them - a certain cool aloofness that made them seem all the more convincing. Some of this is an act, I suspect - our university champ and national prize winner looked like an arrogant Tory when performing, but was a humble, self-effacing and down-to-earth guy who'd buy you a drink you needed it.

A lot of great journalists have this cool demanor, too. Brinkley was a courtly gentleman on air, Rather looks worst when he's over-emoting in a vain attempt to "connect".

I will say that Mansbridge is one of the most approachable "celebs" it has been my good fortune to meet. Genial, polite, great story-teller.

Troy

Raife
06-16-2003, 10:45 AM
Crap, the moment I saw this thread I thought "Naked News", only to find out that you had beaten me to it by a mere hour.

Where's superman to spin the globe backwards and reverse time when you need him?

Returning is the motion of the Tao.
Yielding is the way of the Tao.

Robert Sharp
06-16-2003, 08:14 PM
Editorial? Are you watching the same news I am? The actual news content of television news is rapidly approach zero.

Do you know what editorial means Jason? Are you agreeing or disagreeing? An editorial is something that is more opinion (or moralizing) than reporting.

Jason McCullough
06-16-2003, 09:40 PM
Excuse me: there isn't any news content, and the editorial content is just some windbag spewing for a half-hour.

Robert Sharp
06-18-2003, 08:07 PM
Excuse me: there isn't any news content, and the editorial content is just some windbag spewing for a half-hour.

I agree with that completely. I thought you were trying to disagree with the claim that it was editorial, but you were taking it a step further. I think that's probably true. Even editorializing has become a lost art. They used to be somewhat interesting because at least they were backed by argument. Now everyone thinks he/she has a right to an opinion, whether it is well reasoned or not!

Damien Falgoust
06-20-2003, 07:53 AM
Even Brinkley stopped being a true newscaster once he moved to the Sunday morning circuit - and it was his idea for round-table discussions that led, gradually, to the up-the-ante shout-fest that typifies a lot of American TV journalism.
I always figured PBS's "Firing Line" to be the parent of the modern roundtable-politics television program.

Robert Sharp
06-22-2003, 01:26 PM
Two things:

1. Al Gore is trying to put together a "liberal slanted" news station to counter what he perceives as a right wing slant in current news coverage on most channels. This seems really odd to me. First, I think there are plenty of liberal media outlets. But more importantly, it seems odd to openly and intentionally try to create biased coverage. Doesn't this finally just admit what many of us here are saying? That all the news is just opinion and/or editorializing?

2. I watched WorldLink the other day which had a show on the possibilities of nuclear terrorism. It was called the "Nuclear Iceberg". It was pretty interesting, though it was definitely slanted toward "it's almost here, act now and secure all nuclear materials". Anyway, what struck me was that during "breaks" the network came on asking for pledge money and pointing out that they are the ONLY news network that takes no money from anyone (meaning govt., ads, and other media sources and lobby groups). They thus consider themselves to be the most impartial media outlet on television. This struck me as odd because it suggests that the broadcasters themselves aren't somehow biased. It's just a bias created by the people who PAY the network. that seems a bit naive, though it is probably part of the problem, perhaps even a large part. But you could tell that the people talking about this were pretty biased in their own ways.

Anders Hallin
06-22-2003, 02:36 PM
For what it's worth, I think I got stupider by the second when I was watching Fox News (my grandmother has that channel).

Jason McCullough
06-22-2003, 02:42 PM
Two things:

1. Al Gore is trying to put together a "liberal slanted" news station to counter what he perceives as a right wing slant in current news coverage on most channels. This seems really odd to me. First, I think there are plenty of liberal media outlets. But more importantly, it seems odd to openly and intentionally try to create biased coverage. Doesn't this finally just admit what many of us here are saying? That all the news is just opinion and/or editorializing?


I'm in favor of the Kinsley as-long-as-you're-honest-about-it approach; the British appear to do this just fine. The US media has this wierd fetish for appearing completely non-partisan, which leads to silliness like Fox's repeated insistence that it's "fair and balanced." Just admit it, geez.