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Christien Murawski
04-20-2005, 09:39 PM
magilla

Also spelled Megillah

1.Judaism The scroll containing the biblical narrative of the Book of Esther, traditionally read in synagogues to celebrate the festival of Purim.

2.megillah Slang. A tediously detailed or embroidered account: told us the whole megillah.

"...you got the whole magilla, Tim!"

-Amanpour

TimElhajj
04-20-2005, 09:41 PM
Speaking of magilla, wasn't there a Magilla Gorilla cartoon?

sluggo
04-21-2005, 12:58 AM
I've got a gorilla for sale
Magilla Gorilla for sale.
Won't you buy him,
Take him home and try him,
Gorilla for sale.

Don't you want a little gorilla you can call your own,
A gorilla who'll be with ya when you're all alone?

How much is that gorilla in the window?

Take our advice,
At any price,
A gorilla like Magilla is mighty nice.
Gorilla, Magilla Gorilla for sale.

Bill Dungsroman
04-21-2005, 01:14 AM
Magilla Gorilla was Jewish?

VegasRobb
04-21-2005, 06:00 AM
Magilla Gorilla was Jewish?

I was trying to reconcile this as well.

Justin Fletcher
04-21-2005, 06:16 AM
Well, DUH. He wore a YARMULKE, guys. Sheesh.

http://www.cfhf.net/lyrics/images/magilla.jpg

Supertanker
04-21-2005, 08:57 AM
Magilla's the name of my pet gorilla in WoW.

Gav
04-21-2005, 11:56 AM
In the unlikely case that anyone cares, definition #1 is incomplete. There are 5 megilloth, of which Esther is one. A megillah is a section of the bible that's too short to be called a book (although the 12 minor prophets sorta break this rule, since they're grouped together into one book).

The others are Ruth, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, and Lamentations.

Gav

Miramon
04-21-2005, 01:00 PM
I always figured "Magilla" was Irish. And the gorilla is wearing one of those silly little Derbies that I always associate with the Irish for some reason, (oh I know! They always depict Leprechauns as wearing them) though I see the Derby was in fact invented by William Bowler in England. I wonder if that means the Bowler was invented by some guy named Derby?

Bill Dungsroman
04-21-2005, 03:34 PM
I like how Magilla's suspenders apparently aren't there to keep his pants up.

sluggo
04-21-2005, 03:59 PM
http://www.wingnuttoons.com/magila.jpg

TimElhajj
04-21-2005, 04:35 PM
I always figured "Magilla" was Irish. And the gorilla is wearing one of those silly little Derbies that I always associate with the Irish for some reason, (oh I know! They always depict Leprechauns as wearing them) though I see the Derby was in fact invented by William Bowler in England. I wonder if that means the Bowler was invented by some guy named Derby?

Maybe its like when you investigate famous British authors you discover that most of them really were Irish.

Bub, Andrew
04-21-2005, 04:52 PM
"...you got the whole magilla, Tim!"


I've never seen it spelled out.
But. If you're going to quote me Senor Amanpour, at least make the quote a random link to my website. Failing that, attribution would be nice.

Christien Murawski
04-21-2005, 08:09 PM
Thursday's:

mightiers

1. Having or showing great power, skill, strength or force: a mighty orator; a mighty blow.
2. Imposing or awesome in size, degree or extent: a mighty stone fortress.



"Makes you wonder what was going to be done with a dozen penis mightiers."

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
04-21-2005, 08:15 PM
Oh, and everybody? "Magilla" was Bub's word. I got it from his exceedingly clever post. I did NOT make it up or come up with it myself in any way.

If I could link the quote to his incredibly entertaining and erudite website, I would, but alas, I lack the ability to link things beyond cutting and pasting URL's. I'll learn.

"Yeah, but did we get a thimbleful of credit for it? No. All we got was the sack. Just for creating the Pink Bunkadoo."

-Amanpour

TimElhajj
04-21-2005, 08:18 PM
"Yeah, but did we get a thimbleful of credit for it? No. All we got was the sack. Just for creating the Pink Bunkadoo."

-Amanpour

Are these all like real quotes or are you just making this shit up?

Bill Dungsroman
04-21-2005, 08:23 PM
Oh, and everybody? "Magilla" was Bub's word. I got it from his exceedingly clever post. I did NOT make it up or come up with it myself in any way.

NOSH IT

TimElhajj
04-21-2005, 08:25 PM
DO NOT READ GAMERDAD

No, no no no. I don't Gamerdad no more. I am tired of waking up on the floor. No thank you please, it only makes me sneeze.

ALL TOGETHER NOW PEOPLE...

Justin Fletcher
04-21-2005, 09:25 PM
"Yeah, but did we get a thimbleful of credit for it? No. All we got was the sack. Just for creating the Pink Bunkadoo."

-Amanpour

Are these all like real quotes or are you just making this shit up?
Time Bandits?

Joel
04-22-2005, 05:47 AM
Why do people (you, Xtien) sign posts? It boggles me, especially if it's a different name.

Lunch of Kong
04-22-2005, 05:51 AM
It's just one of those things, Joel.

-Tim Elhajj

quatoria
04-22-2005, 06:04 AM
I don't know what you're talking about, Joel.

- Alan "It's a trap!" Au

TimElhajj
04-22-2005, 06:34 AM
Joel, you have to learn to adapt.

-Tom Chick

Bub, Andrew
04-22-2005, 08:11 AM
alas, I lack the ability to link things beyond cutting and pasting URL's. I'll learn.


Run your cursor over the URL button and look above under TIP and it shows you how to do this. (http://www.quartertothree.com/phpBB2/posting.php?mode=quote&p=409354)

-Doug Lowenstein

TimElhajj
04-22-2005, 08:15 AM
Run your cursor over the URL button and look above under TIP and it shows you how to do this.

-Doug Lowenstein

That's a lot like chewing gum and walking.

-Tom Cruise

Bub, Andrew
04-22-2005, 08:33 AM
That's a lot like chewing gum and walking.


Yeah punk? And I'm all out of bubble gum. Walk-walk-walk.

(and yeah, the Xtien quote above is totally time bandits.)
1. Where would King Arthur be without Guinevere?
2. Happily married, probably.
1. Well, that's a bad... that's a bad example. (-not from Time Bandits)

VegasRobb
04-22-2005, 08:39 AM
Nothing wrong with signing posts.


The Narrator

Christien Murawski
04-23-2005, 11:22 PM
Saturday's:

supine

1. Lying on the back or having the face upward.
2. Having the palm upward. Use of the hand.
3. Marked by or showing lethargy, passivity, or blameworthy indifference. See synonyms at inactive.
4. Inclined; sloping.


Would you look at that, the concave on the convex. So supine, so sublime.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
04-23-2005, 11:35 PM
Why do people (you, Xtien) sign posts? It boggles me, especially if it's a different name.

At first I was going to reply with something dopey and sarcastic, as is my wont, but then it struck me that I had an actual answer to your question. So I'm falling back on that.

This habit goes back to the old days of q23, back when you didn't have to register to be a poster. I think it's required now. At any rate, way back when, before I disappeared for a couple years--henceforth referred to as "the dark time"--you could just post without registering and the only way people knew who the hell had posted was if you actually signed your post. Back then I never bothered to register. I think at the time I was afraid wumpus would somehow get my personal information and start stalking me.

It was a weird time. A more trusting time. I was often struck by how anybody could have written anything and posted it under any of us unregistered posters' names. I preminisce no return to the salad days...

So anyway, I never got over signing my posts. And here we are.

"Charming, to the last. You don't know how hard I found it signing the order to terminate your life."

-Amanpour

Sparky
04-23-2005, 11:53 PM
Yay! I love playing this game.

-- Lev Sergeyevich Termen

Tom Chick
04-24-2005, 12:01 AM
The signing your name thing goes back to Usenet for many of us.

Also, it's helpful for people who've written a post so long that by the time you get to the end, you can't see the name on the left side anymore. You know, people like Kitsune.

-Desslock

quatoria
04-24-2005, 06:41 AM
Totally. Goes back to usenet.

--
"Now here's where you chip in and explain why you've got a fat chunk of Kirkegaard hanging from your posts."
-Tom Chick

Dave Long
04-24-2005, 09:04 AM
God... how many years has it been since we were all on USENET?

--Old Salt

Kitsune
04-24-2005, 09:14 AM
I also do it because its helpful in keeping track in all the conversations I've participated in/am interested in. By signing Kitsune, you can just search for Kitsune on the forum engine and it lists threads with the most recent being the topmost (I don't think it does that if you just search for your username, you just get your posts). Since people tend to call me out from time to time asking for info, its also a good way not to miss them.

-Scholtheim Reinbach III

quatoria
04-25-2005, 12:54 AM
God... how many years has it been since we were all on USENET?

--Old Salt

What... three, now? Four? Most of us left around 2001-2002, didn't we? I know I left towards the beginning of 2002.
--
And when the hourglass has run out, the hourglass of temporality,
when the noise of secular life has grown silent and its restless or
ineffectual activism has come to an end, when everything around you
is still, as it is in eternity, then eternity asks you and every
individual in these millions and millions about only one thing:
whether you have lived in despair or not.

-- Soren Kierkegaard,
"The Sickness Unto Death"

quatoria
04-25-2005, 01:00 AM
Hah. Amusingly, when looking for Tom's query to me which was the origin of the .sig quote I put up earlier, I found a post that explains his love for the 'don't shoot, I'm with the science team,' quote that garnishes the games forum.

http://groups-beta.google.com/group/comp.sys.ibm.pc.games.flight-sim/browse_frm/thread/ab97c303b712e50d/90917c2e5e059831?l=en#90917c2e5e059831

Also, a fun slam on Damien. Aw, who am I kidding, they're all fun!

Christien Murawski
04-25-2005, 11:30 PM
Monday's:

nihilists

1. Philosophy
a. An extreme form of skepticism that denies all existence.
b. A doctrine that holds that all values are baseless and nothing can be known or communicated.

3. The belief that destruction of existing political or social institutions is necessary for future improvement.

4. See also Nihilism. A diffuse revolutionary movement of mid-19th century Russia that scorned authority and tradition and believed in reason, materialism, and radical change in society and government through terrorism and assassination.
(See Fight Club, the commentary track with Edward Norton on same, or Tom Chick's Daily Radar review of same (http://www.quartertothree.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=12402&start=30)).*

And my favorite...

5. Psychiatry A delusion, experienced in some mental disorders, that the world or one's mind, body, or self does not exist.


No Donny, these men are nihilists, there's nothing to be afraid of.

I leave it up to snowcrash22 to attribute the quote.

-Amanpour

*Linked without permission because, well, Tom isn't around right now to give permission.

Christien Murawski
04-26-2005, 10:33 PM
Tuesday's:

leviathan

1. Something unusually large of its kind, especially a ship.
2. A very large animal, especially a whale.
3. A monstrous sea creature mentioned in the Bible.
4. The excuse for why the Bush administration keeps stepping on its dick.

nthe largest or most massive thing of its kind; "it was a leviathan among redwoods"; "they were assigned the leviathan of textbooks" 2: monstrous sea creature symbolizing evil in the Old Testament.

A transliterated Hebrew word (livyathan) meaning "twisted" or "coiled."


As always, government proves to be less than what we expect or need. It is the way of the Leviathan.

-Amanpour

[no mention at dictionary.com of Peter Weller]

madkevin
04-27-2005, 10:09 AM
No Donny, these men are nihilists, there's nothing to be afraid of.

I leave it up to snowcrash22 to attribute the quote.

-Amanpour

Nihilists! Fuck me. I mean, say what you like about the tenets of National Socialism, Dude, at least it's an ethos.

Bub, Andrew
04-27-2005, 10:13 AM
Leviathan swallowed Jonah.



[no mention at dictionary.com of Peter Weller]

Check IMDB. That's Robocop dude.

Gav
04-27-2005, 12:14 PM
Leviathan swallowed Jonah.


That was a big fish. Leviathan is mentioned in Job.

EDIT:
Leviathan's mentioned in a couple of other places, too, briefly. But Job 40-41 has an extended take on it, along with behemoth.

Gav

Bub, Andrew
04-27-2005, 01:26 PM
Leviathan swallowed Jonah.


That was a big fish. Leviathan is mentioned in Job.

EDIT:
Leviathan's mentioned in a couple of other places, too, briefly. But Job 40-41 has an extended take on it, along with behemoth.

Gav

Am I wrong then? I seem to be, but you didn't come out and say it. Maybe I was thinking of Pinnocchio? No wait, that was Monstro.

Tom Chick
04-27-2005, 02:13 PM
Am I wrong then? I seem to be, but you didn't come out and say it.

Yes, you are, as Gav made clear. It's like people who think Satan gave Eve the apple; the book of Genesis just mentions an unnamed snake. Same with the fish that swalled Jonah. It was just a fish with no name. Not even a featured extra, really.

BTW, what Amanpour's dictionary entry left out is that Leviathan is often used as a metaphor for government. This probably has to do with Hobbes writing some tract on government that was titled Leviathan.

-Tom

Troy S Goodfellow
04-27-2005, 02:30 PM
BTW, what Amanpour's dictionary entry left out is that Leviathan is often used as a metaphor for government. This probably has to do with Hobbes writing some tract on government that was titled Leviathan.

-Tom

Specifically, a tract that endorsed the biggest of big governments, absolute monarchy. He started with the premise that all men are equal because they have equal power to bring about the death of another human. The whole "nasty, brutish, and short" life in a world without government. To protect their lives, people should give up some of their natural liberties to an absolute sovereign.

Troy

Bub, Andrew
04-27-2005, 04:14 PM
Yes, you are, as Gav made clear.

I'm right about Pinnochio though Tom. You can't take that away from me.

Christien Murawski
04-27-2005, 04:23 PM
And Peter Weller---DOH!

"Come quietly, or there will be...trouble."

-Amanpour

shift6
04-27-2005, 06:29 PM
Thank you for your cooperation. Good night.

Christien Murawski
04-27-2005, 11:19 PM
Wednesday's:

behemoth

1. Something enormous in size or power.
2. often Behemoth A huge animal, possibly the hippopotamus, described in the Bible.
3. Big Daddy Don BoDean's truck (alt. spelling: bohweamoth)

-1: someone or something that is abnormally large and powerful [syn: giant, goliath, monster, colossus] 2: a person of exceptional importance and reputation [syn: colossus, giant, heavyweight, titan]

(Job 40: 15-24) Some have supposed this to be the Egyptian word meaning "water ox."

According to wikipedia..."Behemoth is a well-known monster in many Final Fantasy videogames."

Furthermore, wikipedia also claims that according to Jewish tradition, it was impossible for anyone to kill behemoth but the one who created it, and I'm not allowed to type that Person's name for fear of being stricken dead. "A later Jewish haggadic tradition furthermore holds that at the banquet at the end of the world, the behemoth will be served up along with the leviathan and ziz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ziz)" (the ziz of course being that giant bird in Jewish mythology we all know and love. Like the Roc).*

I love wikipedia.


Leviathan's mentioned in a couple of other places too, briefly. But Job 40-41 has an extended take on it, along with behemoth.

-Amanpour

*not Duane Johnson

TimElhajj
04-28-2005, 09:14 AM
Jewish haggadic tradition furthermore holds that at the banquet at the end of the world, the behemoth will be served up along with the leviathan and ziz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ziz)"


Shocked to discover it all taste like chicken.

shift6
04-28-2005, 05:36 PM
It's like people who think Satan gave Eve the apple;
Plus he didn't give it to her, plus it wasn't an apple, plus her name wasn't Eve at the time. I see just what you mean, dude. :wink:

Rywill
04-28-2005, 06:15 PM
It's like people who think Satan gave Eve the apple;
Plus he didn't give it to her, plus it wasn't an apple, plus her name wasn't Eve at the time. I see just what you mean, dude. :wink:
That's extra-funny if I use John Goodman's voice in my head.

Christien Murawski
04-29-2005, 09:49 PM
Friday's:

beard

1. The hair on a man's chin, cheeks, and throat.
2. A hairy or hairlike growth such as that on or near the face of certain mammals.
3. A tuft or group of hairs or bristles on certain plants, such as barley and wheat.
4. One who serves to divert suspicion or attention from another.
5. Printing The raised slope on a piece of type between the shoulder or counter and the face. Also called neck.
6. Jennifer Garner. Penelope Cruz. Nicole Kidman. Tom Arnold. Princess Diana. Cindy Crawford. et al.

tr.v.
1. To furnish with a beard.
2. To confront boldly.

Beard, James Andrew
American cookery expert widely considered to be one of the foremost authorities on American cuisine.

And at last we come to Wikipedia. There's an entire page on the history of beards. Zeus. Poseidon. Amish people. Blah blah blah beards. Until you get to the very bottom...

Slang
Beard is also a slang term for a female companion "kept" to disguise a male's homosexuality.

So there you have it.


For a year or two acting as a beard, Katie gets to increase her profile considerably. A nicely done Hollywood deal i think.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
04-30-2005, 09:32 PM
Saturday's:

hysteria

1. Behavior exhibiting excessive or uncontrollable emotion, such as fear or panic.
2. A mental disorder characterized by emotional excitability and sometimes by amnesia or a physical deficit, such as paralysis, or a sensory deficit, without an organic cause.
3. When people mistake burritos for guns, and tell the police about it.
4. A Def Leppard album that's no Pyromania.

wikipedia:

Hysteria is a diagnostic label applied to a state of mind, one of unmanageable fear or emotional excesses. The fear is often centered on a body part, most often on an imagined problem with that body part (disease is a common complaint). People who are "hysterical" often lose self-control due to an overwhelming fear.

The term originates with the Greek medical term, hysterikos. This referred to a supposed medical condition, peculiar to women, caused by a disturbance of the uterus, hysteria in Greek. The term hysteria was coined by Hippocrates, who thought the cause of hysteria was the irregular movement of blood from the uterus to the brain.

Hysteria is often associated with movements like the Salem Witch Trials, the Red Scare, McCarthyism, and Satanic abuse, where it is better understood through the related sociological term of moral panic.


I can understand your reticence XMA, but I'm agfraid this still qualifies as hysteria. Hysterical reactions are always justified by the "But what if it was?" defense.

-Amanpour

Tom Chick
05-01-2005, 12:15 AM
Can we have this cool thread someplace where the hscroll isn't broken? Maybe each Qt3 word of the day should get its own thread? Or would that be too peripatetic? Also, can we make requests for words of the day? If so, can my request be 'peripatetic'?

-Tom

Bill Dungsroman
05-01-2005, 07:36 AM
WTF is "Satanic abuse?" I've always fancied myself more of a casual Satan user, if you must know. At parties or on special occasions, and so forth.

Christien Murawski
05-01-2005, 12:28 PM
Can we have this cool thread someplace...

Sure. We can have it wherever you people want it. It just seemed to go best under Everything else, but just let me know.


where the hscroll isn't broken?

I don't know what this means. Did I mess up something? Format something wrong? Break the Internets?


Maybe each Qt3 word of the day should get its own thread? Or would that be too peripatetic?

I don't know if it'll be too peripatetic, but I'm pretty sure it would be too effete. How about I just start a new thread for May?


Also, can we make requests for words of the day? If so, can my request be 'peripatetic'?

Sure. Requests are welcome. In fact, I meant to honor your request for Thursday's word, but I didn't get home until 2:45am that night, for some reason. So I'll do a supplemental.

"He sang the strangest songs to me, by bands I had never heard of: Boston, Kansas, America, Europe, Asia...travel exhausts me."

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-01-2005, 12:37 PM
Thursday's word...supplemental:

fleshpot

1. A district or establishment offering sensual pleasure or entertainment. Often used in the plural.
2. Physical or sensual gratification.

I actually went with this one, because I thought you folks needed to Brush Up Your Bible (http://www.gracecathedral.org/enrichment/brush_excerpts/brush_20040317.shtml):

"In retrospect, slavery doesn't seem so bad at all: at least the Israelites had their fill of the famous flesh pots of Egypt."

"Those who wish to be more precise use the more derivative term "sexpot," which gets right to the point."

So. Slavery not so bad. Unless you're a vegetarian.


Fleshpot Egypt.

-Amanpour

Equis
05-01-2005, 12:39 PM
Also, can we make requests for words of the day? If so, can my request be 'peripatetic'?

Sure. Requests are welcome. In fact, I meant to honor your request for Thursday's word, but I didn't get home until 2:45am that night, for some reason. So I'll do a supplemental.

"He sang the strangest songs to me, by bands I had never heard of: Boston, Kansas, America, Europe, Asia...travel exhausts me."

-Amanpour

Hey,
Just a thought.
But I don't personally like the idea of "requests" for word of the day.

I kinda like seeing what pops up in the everyday posting of other posters. That at least gives some context to the word of the day. Rather than someone, say, exercising his vocabulary just so he can enjoy a brief spate of mental masturbation.

Besides, if we don't know where the word of the day is coming from, it could inspire us to pepper our already loquacious diatribes with increasingly feckless adjectives in tautologically vainglorious attempts to ascend to that position of master interlocutor.

Tom Chick
05-01-2005, 02:49 PM
Besides, if we don't know where the word of the day is coming from, it could inspire us to pepper our already loquacious diatribes with increasingly feckless adjectives in tautologically vainglorious attempts to ascend to that position of master interlocutor.

Equis, nice try at sounding like Dr. Crypt, but you need better words. :)

Amanpour, hscroll is 'horizontal scroll'. It gets broken when someone posts an URL that's too long to fit a typical browser's width. Since quatoria was too lazy to use www.tinyurl.com, now we all have to scroll horiztontally to read these posts. Which most of us are too lazy to do. It'll get fixed when this thread moves to a new page or when quatoria edits his post.

-Tom

TimElhajj
05-01-2005, 02:55 PM
It's all quatoria's fault.

shift6
05-01-2005, 03:00 PM
where the hscroll isn't broken?
I don't know what this means. Did I mess up something? Format something wrong? Break the Internets?
Nah, quat did it, the big poop head. Those of us who look at the internet at only 1024x768 are clearly not elite.

Tom Chick
05-01-2005, 03:02 PM
Whew. Thanks for the new page, shift. Okay, Amanpour, carry on.

-Tom

Bill Dungsroman
05-01-2005, 06:30 PM
With apologies to dead Long Beach latino rock/reggae artists:

"I don't read posts from quatoria,
I don't like his URLs at all:
It had a million letters and I,
I couldn't spell it alllll!"

Mike Cathcart
05-01-2005, 08:34 PM
ban
tr.v. banned, ban·ning, bans

1. To prohibit, especially by official decree. See Synonyms at forbid.
2. South African. Under the former system of apartheid, to deprive (a person suspected of illegal activity) of the right of free movement and association with others.
3. Archaic. To curse.
n.
1. An excommunication or condemnation by church officials.
2. A prohibition imposed by law or official decree.
3. Censure, condemnation, or disapproval expressed especially by public opinion.
4. A curse; an imprecation.
5. A summons to arms in feudal times.

TimElhajj
05-01-2005, 09:30 PM
ban
tr.v. banned, ban·ning, bans

1. To prohibit, especially by official decree. See Synonyms at forbid.
2. South African. Under the former system of apartheid, to deprive (a person suspected of illegal activity) of the right of free movement and association with others.
3. Archaic. To curse.
n.
1. An excommunication or condemnation by church officials.
2. A prohibition imposed by law or official decree.
3. Censure, condemnation, or disapproval expressed especially by public opinion.
4. A curse; an imprecation.
5. A summons to arms in feudal times.

Beware, gentle viewers. Not an offical word of the day.

Christien Murawski
05-01-2005, 11:28 PM
Sunday's:

sigh

v. intr.

1. a. To exhale loudly in a long deep breath, as in weariness or relief.
b. To emit a similar sound: willows sighing in the wind
2. To feel longing or grief, yearn: sighing for their lost youth.

v. tr.

1. To express with or as if with an audible exhalation.
2. Archaic. To lament.

noun

1. The act or sound of sighing.
2. The reaction to a dopey message board post. Usually accompanied by a "rolling eyes" emoticon.

And, of course, your friend and mine...Wikipedia:

Sigh is an avant-guarde black metal band from Tokyo, Japan that was formed in 1989. They are credicted as being one of the first Japanese black metal bands, when the majority of black metal in the early 1990s came from Scandinavia.

Lineup:
Satoshi Fujinami (drums)
Shinichi Ichikawa (guitar)
Mirai Kawashima (everything else)

Discography:
Scorn Defeat, Infidel Art, Hail Horror Hail, Scenario IV: Dread Dreams, Imaginary Sonicscape.


Sigh. A boy can dream...

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-02-2005, 11:51 PM
Monday's:

hootenanny

1. An informal performance by folk singers, typically with participation by the audience.
2. Informal. An unidentified or unidentifiable gadget.

Wikipedia:

Hootenanny was an old 1960s variety show and is currently the title of a show by Jools Holland every New Year's Eve on BBC2 in the UK.

Then I found this place called Infoplease (http://www.infoplease.com/index.html):

1. A social gathering or informal concert featuring folk singing and, sometimes, dancing.
2. an informal session at which folk singers and instrumentalists perform for their own enjoyment. (emphasis mine)
3. Older use. a thingumbob.

-Thingumbob? Thingumbob? WTF? Is this how that word is spelled? I have always said, in my head and otherwise, "thing-a-ma-bob"...now I've got to re-think everything. Sigh.

-The other thing I liked about "Infoplease"--other than its utterly inane name--was that it gave links to the word that would come before hootenanny and the word that would come after in the what I'm sure is totally comprehensive "Infoplease" archives.

Before hootenanny: hootchy-kootchy
After hootenanny: hooter

Encyclopedia Britannica...look out!


Asjunk's post in Phil's meet-a-mate thread (plus a pleasant PM from fire) has moved me to attempt the second DC/MA/VA Quartertothree Hootnenanny and beer bash.

-Incidentally, TSG's quote brings to mind, for me, the moment in "The Simsons" when Lisa reads the words, "Yahoo Serious Film Festival."

-Amanpour

TimElhajj
05-03-2005, 06:29 AM
I didn't realize we had any folk singers posting on this board and here we have enough for a bonafide hootenanny.

Christien Murawski
05-04-2005, 01:56 AM
Tuesday's:

Ragnarok

-dictionary.com:

The so-called "Twilight of the Gods" (called in German Gotterdammerung), the final destruction of the world in the great conflict between the [AE]sir (gods) on the one hand, and on the other, the gaints [sic] and the powers of Hel under the leadership of Loki (who is escaped from bondage).

n: myth about the ultimate destruction of the gods in a battle with evil.

n. dorks.: the final battle of the wits on Quarter to Three.

-Wikipedia:

In Norse mythology, Ragnarok ("fate of the gods"*) is the battle at the end of the world. Not only will the gods, giants, and monsters perish in this apocalyptic conflagration, but almost everything in the universe will be torn asunder...

What is unique about Ragnarok as an armageddon tale is that the gods already know through prophecy what is going to happen: when the event will occur, who will be slain by whom, and so forth. They even realize that they are powerless to prevent Ragnarok. But they will still bravely and defiantly face their bleak destiny.

*from the Notes section at the end of the page: "Ragnarok does not mean "twilight of the gods"; that phrase is the translation of Gotterdammerung, which, in turn, is a German mistranslation of the word Ragnarok, arising from confusion Old Norse rok ("fate") and rokr ("twilight")."

-You have been warned.

-Oh, and according to the second note on that page, "The name of this cock is nowhere stated." I just wanted to type the word "cock" since I had to forgo the word "tool" when "ragnarok" became the word of the day.

-in other Wikipedia news:

RagNaRok is the fifth album, released in 1995 on Metal Blade Records, by the novelty rock/heavy metal/punk band Gwar. This album contains the most varied vocal stylings of any Gwar album, as the majority of the bands lends their lungs to the tracklist.

-do yourself a favor and go and read the synopsis of the album (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RagNaRok) that follows the above on Wikipedia. Who needs Spinal Tap when you've got this?

For starters...

"The story involves Oderus and his alien sister Slymenstra being forcibly mated with the aid of rogue space aliens."

Good times.

-finally Wikipedia tells us that Ragnarok Online is a MMORPG from South Korea.


I don't think any of us will know who'd win that battle of wits - we'll have to wait until QT3's Ragnarok. But I thought it was cute...

-I let that quote run long because I just love that the good Dr. finds a way to get the word "cute" so close to the word "Ragnarok."

-On a personal note, today was an embarrassment of riches, word wise. I had to pass up the word I've been waiting for, the very reason I started this thread to get to someday define, because there were a bunch of better words. Oh well, hopefully somebody will use that other word again someday.

-Amanpour

edit for housekeeping

400

Rywill
05-04-2005, 06:43 AM
Is it "tableau"? I'm hoping it is. If it is, I just used it specifically as a favor to you. Do I have to use it in an actual sentence? If so: I don't know what tableau means.

TimElhajj
05-04-2005, 06:45 AM
Is it "tableau"? I'm hoping it is. If it is, I just used it specifically as a favor to you. Do I have to use it in an actual sentence? If so: I don't know what tableau means.

Nope, I bet it's yenta (http://www.quartertothree.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=415418#415418).

DrCrypt
05-04-2005, 06:48 AM
Man, it better be. "Yenta" is the first word of the day that actually deserves to be.

TimElhajj
05-04-2005, 08:18 AM
Man, it better be. "Yenta" is the first word of the day that actually deserves to be.

Yep, beats ragonrocks or whatever. We should poll on the words of the day. :)

Matthew Gallant
05-04-2005, 08:26 AM
Geez, if you guys are so hot for Yiddish loan words, watch some Coffee Talk or something. How about some real words of the day like majuscule or anastrophe?

Christien Murawski
05-05-2005, 12:14 AM
Wednesday's:

cornholed

-I guess we'll just have to go straight to the Wikipedia for this one:

Cornhole, or Corn Toss, is a game in which players take turns pitching small bags filled with corn (or beans) at a raised platform with a hole in the far end. A corn bag in the hole (!) scores 3 points, while one on the platform scores 1 point. Play continues until a player reaches 21. (exclamation point mine)

-Okay, okay...Wikipedia also says...

"A slang term for anus, also used as a verb to describe anal sex."

-Most shocking to me, actually, is that if you Google cornhole, the first few pages are only about the sport of Cornholing. There are no anus-inspired links whatsoever, at least until you reach a blog called "Yawning Anus." Kind of rocks my world as to what the Internets are all about.

The before and after words from Infoplease, are "corn grits" and "cornhouse" for those who care.

-Finally, on a personal note, according to the bylaws of Q23 Word-of-the-Day, no word can be picked that reminds me of Barbra Streisand. Sorry.


What sort of lewd hand gesture is equally inappropriate to being asked how one feels about being corn-holed* constantly by their husband? This sort of thing just makes my mind work furiously.

*Corn-holed, one word or two? Does it take a hypen? Spell it just like it sounds? My Encarta has let me down here. I can't seem to write corn-holed without thinking of Micheal burning his hand on the cornholer invention from AD

-Amanpour

Troy S Goodfellow
05-05-2005, 03:37 AM
A colleague at my school was telling me that they had a game in Indiana called "cornhole" but we refused to believe her because it just sounded so stupid.

Turns out she was right.

Troy

TimElhajj
05-05-2005, 06:33 AM
A colleague at my school was telling me that they had a game in Indiana called "cornhole" but we refused to believe her because it just sounded so stupid.

Turns out she was right.

Troy

You gotta hope those kids use condoms when they "play" the cornhole game.

"You decide Mary. Pin the tail, spin the bottle, or cornhole?"

Bill Dungsroman
05-05-2005, 10:00 AM
So, when do we get a word for which I (or anyone who has English as their first language and is older than Jose Liz) don't know the definition?

Tom Chick
05-05-2005, 11:29 AM
So, when do we get a word for which I (or anyone who has English as their first language and is older than Jose Liz) don't know the definition?


As soon as you guys use one! It is the Qt3 Word of the Day, so Amanpour can't very well pick something out of the dictionary just to befuddle you guys.

Personally, I don't have to not know a word to enjoy it being dissected. Otherwise, Safire's weekly column would be a waste of space.

-Tom

Bill Dungsroman
05-05-2005, 01:53 PM
So, when do we get a word for which I (or anyone who has English as their first language and is older than Jose Liz) don't know the definition?


As soon as you guys use one! It is the Qt3 Word of the Day, so Amanpour can't very well pick something out of the dictionary just to befuddle you guys.

Personally, I don't have to not know a word to enjoy it being dissected. Otherwise, Safire's weekly column would be a waste of space.

-Tom
Befuddled for the 0.1 seconds it takes to go from the bolded word in question to the definition, you mean? Some of us don't just enjoy the dissection of the word for the simple sake of the dissection, you etymological ghoul.

TimElhajj
05-05-2005, 04:39 PM
I am just waiting for the statistical tally that shows who amoung us is coughing up the most Words of the Day.

Rywill
05-05-2005, 04:41 PM
I will personally give you $50 if you do "prosopopeially."

Murph
05-05-2005, 04:51 PM
Just chiming in here for a "lol@Rywill."

Matthew Gallant
05-05-2005, 04:52 PM
I will personally give you $50 if you do "prosopopeially."
I'm pretty sure that was the primary aim of The Narrator all along, and that sticking it to Jose was secondary.

Or...

tertiary?

DUN DUN DUNNNNNN.

Christien Murawski
05-06-2005, 01:55 AM
Thursday's:

semantics

1. Linguistics. The study or science of meaning in language.
2. Linguistics. The study of relationships between signs and symbols and what they represent. Also called semasiology.
3. The meaning or the interpretation of a word, sentence, or other language form: We're basically agreed; let's not quibble over semantics.
4. What happens when you ask for help picking out games for your hot new gaming rig.

-Wikipedia:

In general semantics, (from the Greek semantikos, or "significant meaning," derived from sema, sign) is the study of meaning, in some sense of that term. Semantics is often opposed to syntax, in which the former pertains to what something means while the latter pertains to the formal structure/patterns in which something is expressed (for example written or spoken).

Semantics is distinguished from ontology (knowledge of existance[sic]) in being about the use of a word more than the nature of the entity referenced by the word. This is reflected in the argument, "That's only semantics" when someone tries to draw conclusions about what is true about the world based on what is true about a word.


Wow. This is such a sematics[sic] battle.

I'm making an assumption here.

-Amanpour

TimElhajj
05-06-2005, 06:23 AM
Word!

Murph
05-06-2005, 09:36 AM
Damn!! I was so honored to see that I'd had a word of the day...and then embarrassed to see that I typo'd.

You guys know that I actually can spell, right?

And, of course, you assumed correctly.

TimElhajj
05-06-2005, 11:15 AM
sematic

se·mat·ic [se máttik]
adjective

acting as warning to predators: used to describe bright colorings on particular animals that act as a warning to predators, for example, because the animals are poisonous

Murph
05-06-2005, 04:07 PM
Wow. What a difference an "n" can make.

Christien Murawski
05-07-2005, 03:23 AM
Friday's:

casus belli

An act or event that provokes or is used to justify war.

-Wikipedia:

Casus belli is a Latin expression from the international law theory of Jus ad bellum. Formally, the expression (which can be translated as "risk of war" or "occasion for war") is the grievances section of a formal public declaration of war by a state, which lists: the grievances it has against another state which are or may be the cause of war, the intentions it has in prosecuting the war, and the actions the other state could take to avert conflict or restore peace. The declaration thus seeks to meet the Jus Ad Bellum criteria of "Just Cause", "Public Declaration", and Ultima Ratio ("Last Resort"). However, formal declarations of war are rare nowadays, and casus belli is now widely used to simply mean a nation's motives for going to war, without reference to any formal documents or proposed means of redress, and sometimes without even implying that these motives are just.

The expression can however be translated in slightly different ways:

-This is the case, the opportunity for a war;
-This is how things go during a war, a typical consequence of war (casus can also mean "accident", "casual event").

Adding to the confusion, the term is widely misspelled as causus belli which is translated as "cause of war."

Like many Latin expressions, this one is sometimes used improperly by politicians or journalists for intrumental purposes. Its correct use is more often found in historical works, when describing ex post those events which effectively lead to a war.

Today casus belli is also used to indicate a French role-playing game magazine and computer wargames.

-Infoplease bookend words:

Before: casuistry
After: cat

-FWIW, the sixth entry that pops up when you type the word into Infoplease (god I'd like to find the people who named this site and just smack them silly) is George Walker Bush.


...and regardless of what was best for the U.S. and the Iraqi people and the world, the invasion of Iraq was foisted upon the Iraqi people and the citizenry of the U.S. on a specious casus belli that furthermore turned out to be more fabricated than not.

[Random Note: I'm relieved that casus belli beat out (not off) one of today's word finalists, necrophiliac (or necropheliac), because I didn't want people thinking I was looking at that porn-girl thread in Games. However, and I realize this is cheating, I have to link to the Necromouse picture (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Necromouse12hd.jpg) from Wikipedia. This image alone, along with the attendant point that necrophilia is not just for humans anymore, almost swayed the choice.]

-Amanpour

TimElhajj
05-07-2005, 09:16 AM
Ok, who is picking these things. Because that one mouse cornholing the dead mouse is clearly worthy of a go. Clearly this is a sematic act for mice; and that's not just semantics. This is a sort of Ragnarok (and I say that in the Norse mythology sense) for small rodents.

By the way, what is that hootenanny holding the dead mouse still? Seeing it makes me want to sigh and ban these sort of death traps.

Jose Liz
05-07-2005, 07:52 PM
So, when do we get a word for which I (or anyone who has English as their first language and is older than Jose Liz) don't know the definition?

My vocabulary is very good, actually.

Christien Murawski
05-07-2005, 11:07 PM
Okay, side note, and I don't mean this in any way to be encouraging la dogpile, but who is this Jose Liz person? Will somebody thumbnail this for me? I'm coming late to the game and I'm lost.

No disrespect to the inimitable Mr.(?) Liz is intended, whether he is reading this or not, but tonight alone I've read three separate posts where he has claimed to have a good vocabulary, to have positive self-esteem, and to be, indeed, a man. If there was ever a case of "methinks thou dost protest too much," this has to be it.

Is this Jose Liz a real person, or some strange alter-ego creation? What is the deal?

"Hey, Jose...Who, why, when and how I fuck is none of your business. Okay?"

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-07-2005, 11:34 PM
Saturday's:

machismo

-dictionary.com:

(ma-cheeez-moe)

1. A strong or exaggerated sense of masculinity stressing attributes such as physical courage, virility, domination of women, aggressiveness. (see Caspe at Shoot Club)
2. An exaggerated sense of strength or toughness: "People prefer raw-milk cheese for its subtlety and depth of flavor, not out of some kid of foodie machismo."
3. The fail-safe way gaming nerds will attract all the porn stars.

-Wikipedia:

Machismo is a noun of Spanish origin, and refers to a prominently exhibited or excessive masculinity. The word machismo--and its derivatives machista and macho, "he who espouses machismo"--comes from the Spanish word macho, meaning "male" or "manly." (The word macho literally translates as "male", but is applied primarily to animals in this sense.)

Macho can mean courageous or valorous, although machista rarely has positive connotations.

The most common Spanish term for a woman with exaggerated feminine pride is feminista (as in "feminist"), although some Spanish speakers prefer the female equivalent of macho: hembra ("female" in Spanish), as in "Yo, soy muy macho, pero tu eres muy hembra" ("I am very macho, but you are very hembra.")

In American literature--[SPOILERS]--a memorable example of machismo comes from Tennessee Williams' character Stanley Kowalski, the egotistical brother-in-law in A Streetcar Named Desire. In the play (and in the motion picture), Stanley epitomizes the hyper-masculine alpha-male, socially and physically dominating and imposing his will upon his wife and sister, Blanche DuBois. Bound up with Stanley's aggressive and occasionally misogynist views is a strong sense of pride and honor which leads to his hatred of Blanche, and to his spending copious hours of his spare time leveling up his gnome in World of Warcraft.

-Quien mas macho, Fernando Lamas o Ricardo Montalban? Quien mas macho...Lamas o Montalban?


Between this and the frequent pathetic attempts at machismo: "I'd hit it!", I can see why more women don't post in this forum.

-Amanpour

Murph
05-08-2005, 12:03 AM
The highlights of Jose Liz:

http://www.quartertothree.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=18028

http://www.quartertothree.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=18612

http://www.quartertothree.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=18658

Christien Murawski
05-08-2005, 12:53 AM
That is some choice reading. Thanks, Murph! While I could feel brain cells jumping off the top floor while I read that stuff, I'm still thankful for the catch-up. From this I get that he's a game reviewer with inflated scores (self-admitted), a future Ivy-Leaguer, and a standardized test fetishist. I'm still not sure I believe he's an actual person, but at least I'm closer to understanding why I read those three weird things by him this evening.

My favorite quote from your links:


For the record, no one on this forum has ever won an argument against me.

That might be the best thing I have ever read on these forums if not for the earlier "ramble" quote by Koontz. Tough call.

I liked this too though:


If I had a mob, I would also fare better.

It's stuff like that that makes me think he's not real. Maybe one of Tom's alter-egos or something.

"Look, I don't want to get into a semantic argument. I just want the protein."

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-09-2005, 01:40 AM
Sunday's:

snarky

-dictionary.com:

adj. Slang snarkier, snarkiest

Irritable or short-tempered, irascible.

[From dialectical snark, to nag, from snark, snork, to snore, snort, from Dutch and low German snorken, of imitative origin.]

snarkily adv.

-Wikipedia:

Snark refers to a pejorative style of speech or writing. It could loosely be described as irritable or "snidely derisive"; hence, 'snarkish', 'snarky', 'to snark at somebody'. It could be less politely described as 'bitchy'.

This word has Germanic origins and is etymologically unrelated to the imaginary creature in Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark.

-UrbanDictionary.com:

[Note: this is a slang dictionary where people put up their definitions of slang terms and other folks vote on said defintions. The number one, by far:]

1. snarky: (adjective) describes a witty mannerism, personality, or behavior that is a combination of sarcasm and cynicism. Usually accepted as a complimentary term. Snark is usually mistaken for a snotty or arrogant attitude.

-pseudodictionary.com:

[Note: another little slang dictionary, with a title font that reminds me of Fight Club. Sort of the dictionary equivalent of "Fred's Bank." I used this one because I liked the example, and the fact that this definition was "submitted by Tamara"...I want to get all my linguistic assistance in the future from people named Tamara. Or even Tammy.]

snarky- When the word "bitchy" is too negative, use "snarky."

e.g., Peter said we couldn't go to the movies without giving any explanation as to why not. We agreed that he was just being snarky, so we went without him.


I didn't get one and I've been posting snarky comments about Freddie Prinze Jr. (he's so dreamy) all over.

Bonus:


Because for all the snarkiness, 9/11 was the cause of alot of economic tough times as well as Bush's idiotic march to war.

Double-dog Bonus:

From Homicide: Life on the Street,

Mike: I don't know, uh, the last time we worked together you were kind of snarky.
Tim: Snarky?
Mike: Yeah, snarky, from the Ancient Greek, meaning butt head.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-10-2005, 12:01 AM
Monday's:

freak

-dictionary.com:

n.
a fleck or streak of color

tr. v. freaked, freaking, freaks
To speckle or streak with color: "the white Pink, and the Pansy freaked with jet" (John Milton).

1. A thing or occurrence that is markedly unusual or irregular.
2. An abnormally formed organism, especially an animal or person regarded as a curiosity or monstrosity.
3. A sudden capricious turn of mind, a whim.
4. Slang.
a. A drug user or addict: a speed freak.
b. An eccentric or noncomformist person, especially a member of a counterculture.
c. An enthusiast: rock music freaks.

-Wikipedia:

Nowadays, "freak" more colloquially refers to people who are physically normal (usual number of limbs, organs, etc.) but otherwise odd. Think Napoleon Dynamite in the eponymous film, or Ally Sheedy's character in The Breakfast Club, or indeed the obviously TV show, "Freaks and Geeks."

In a mutational sense, "freak" has taken on a highly un-PC connotation. Just as the days of bearded ladies and midgets in the sideshow are over, so is this term for them passed into the realm of Things Polite People Really Just Don't Say Anymore (at least to refer to a freak of this genetic sort).

A natural freak is a mutant and a made freak is one who, though wasn't born abnormally, experienced a change some time during their life. (Yes, X-men is linked in the entry.)

In ancient times and up to the early 20th century, the birth of children with abnormalities was heavily associated with astrological events. Rues cited the recent solar ellipses as reason for the increase in mutated infants born at that time. Another prominent theory of the 19th century was the one in which, if a pregnant woman was scared by an object or organism, the child would be born with the quality of the source. This is to say that if she was frightened by a bird, the infant may supposedly be born with wings.

-Can you guess what movie I'm thinking of, and how this movie relates to the subject of the quote below?

-Infoplease before/after words:

before = F.R.C.S. (Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons)
after = freaking


She tells the truth about this freak, and he gets off, and she can forget about ever seeing her kids again.

-Amanpour

Tom Chick
05-10-2005, 01:02 AM
-Can you guess what movie I'm thinking of, and how this movie relates to the subject of the quote below?

Willow, starring Val Kilmer?

-Tom

Bill Dungsroman
05-10-2005, 08:45 AM
-Can you guess what movie I'm thinking of, and how this movie relates to the subject of the quote below?

Willow, starring Val Kilmer?

-Tom

You really are great!

Matthew Gallant
05-10-2005, 08:59 AM
Willard, starring Crispin Glover?

-Ben

Christien Murawski
05-10-2005, 09:33 AM
-Can you guess what movie I'm thinking of, and how this movie relates to the subject of the quote below?

Willow, starring Val Kilmer?

-Tom

Nice try, Tom! Actually it's Passion of the Christ. How'd you like that again?

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-10-2005, 09:38 AM
Willard, starring Crispin Glover?

-Ben

Willard is a great guess, actually. (I mean that sincerely, this time.) I didn't even think of that one. Nice.

It's actually another film that has a weird connection to Michael Jackson, but I wish it were Willard now.

"Tear him up."

-Amanpour

Matthew Gallant
05-10-2005, 11:21 AM
I was kind of stretching and riffing off of Willow. I don't think they covered Willard's birth in the movie, but I imagine if they did that his mom probably saw a rat when he was born.

Christien Murawski
05-11-2005, 01:28 AM
Tuesday's:

suss

-dictionary.com:

tr. v. Slang sussed, sussing, susses

1. To infer or discover, figure out: "I think I'm good at sussing out what's going on." (Ry Cooder)
2. To size up, study: "Suss out the designers in whom you are interested." (Lucia van der Post)
3. The way to defeat a boss: "Suss out the Chinese dude wearing those weird platform shoes and we'll be able to see the chick naked with the panther." (Horner)
4. "I'd do her." (Caspe)

-urbandictionary.com

Adj.(chiefly Rio Grande Valley, TX)

1. Filthy, disgusting, or revolting
2. Promiscuous

Noun

1. A filthy, disgusting or revolting person.
ORIGIN: derived from the Spanish 'sucio': (dirty)

-let us recall that "urban dictionary" is a place where people put up their own definitions, and folks vote for them. The above is the top vote getter. Here is number 4 (it got one vote):

Acronym for:
Straight Up Street Slut
Pronounced like Dr. Seuss

Rob: Hey, Mark, did you see me making out with that chick?
Mark: Ya, and I also saw her making out with some other guy 5 minutes ago. Rob, she's a complete SUSS!"

-askoxford.com:

brit. informal.
verb(sussed, sussing)

1. (often suss out) realize or understand the true character or nature of
2. sussed clever and well informed

ORIGIN: abbreviation of suspect

<Warning: for these last couple, put on your In-Brain Imaginary British Accent>

-cambridge.org:

to discover what someone or something is really like, or to find out how a machine or a piece of equipment works.
She's quite strange. I haven't been able to suss her out at all.
I couldn't work out how to programme my video recorder, but Kate soon sussed it out.
Have you sussed out if there are any good bars near here?

-peevish.co.uk:

[slang and colloquialisms of the U.K.]

Verb. To work something out, to understand, to ascertain. Often followed by 'out'.
Adj. Abb. of suspicious. e.g. "I don't like the looks of that bloke, he's suss."


This is how you suss out a boss.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-12-2005, 12:30 AM
Wednesday's:

slog

-dictionary.com:

v.slog, slogging, slogs

1. To walk or progress with a slow heavy pace; plod: slog across the swamp; slogged through both volumes.
2. To work diligently for long hours: slogged away at Latin.
3. Reading a thread about a pre-Ivy Leaguer's standardized test scores that's supposed to be about PC games.
4. How Rumsfeld views the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

-wikipedia:

Slog v. to social network and blog. The activity of social networking and blogging together in a combined environment. This is the natural progression within the recent growth of social networks and blogs. Some early stages of slogs are, AlwaysOn (http://www.alwayson.network.com/) (aka, the Irony Network, since it isn't on right now as I try to link it), a high-tech community, and 1UP.com (http://www.1up.com/), a video gamers' community.

Derivative of this new word would be 'slogging' and 'slogosphere'.

-infoplease:

v. tr.
1. to hit hard, as in boxing or cricket; slug. (incidentally, "a slogger is a person who just slogs the ball.")
2. to drive with blows.

v. intr.
1. to deal heavy blows.
2. to walk or plod heavily.
3. to toil.

n.
1. a long, tiring walk or march.
2. long, laborious work.
3. a heavy blow.

-word before: sloe gin
-word after: slogan


Congrats, btw. A long and hard slog.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-13-2005, 11:33 AM
Thursday's:

cachet

-dictionary.com:

(ka-shay)

1. A mark of quality, as of distinction, individuality, or authenticity. "Federal courts have a certain cachet which state courts lack." (Christian Science Monitor).
2. A seal on a document, such as a letter.
3. a. A commemorative design stamped on an envelope to mark a postal or philatelic event.
b. A motto forming part of a postal cancellation.
4. A kind of wafer capsule formerly used by pharmacists for presenting an unpleasant tasting drug.
5. What the porn industry doesn't have, else they'd sue our asses for downloading their content (even though we only watch for no more than twenty minutes at a time, for some reason)
6. A new adult film actress, Cachet Coxxxx. Oeuvre includes such works as, Serious Clam and Command and Cock Her.*

[French, from Old French, from cacher, to press. See cache]

cachet

[n]1: An indication of approved or superior status [syn: seal, seal of approval] 2: A warrant formerly issued by a French King who could warrant imprisonment or death in a letter signed under his seal [syn: lettre de cachet] 3: seal on a letter.

-encarta.msn.com

1. quality that attracts attention

4. collector's mark: a small mark made on the back of a postage stamp by a stamp collector.


Porn: I imagine it's because the porn industry either doesn't care to prosecute or doesn't have the cachet to get anywhere with legislation.

-Amanpour

*Titles courtesy of Pepper Tanker

<edit for date...thanks Bull>

Bull
05-13-2005, 01:40 PM
We've got two Wednesdays and no Thursday and it's already Friday.

Christien Murawski
05-14-2005, 12:55 AM
Friday's:

midget

-dictionary.com:

n.

1. Offensive. An extremely small person who is otherwise normally proportioned.
2. A small or miniature version of something.
3. A class of small objects, as a class of very small sailboats or cars.
4. The people who sired the creator of those Yoda films. (spacemonkey)

adj.

1. Miniature, diminutive.
2. Belonging to a type or class much smaller than what is considered standard: a midget automobile.

[diminutive of midge]

-Wikipedia.org:

The term midget refers to something that is smaller than usual but well proportioned.

In the 19th Century, midget was a medical term referring to an extremely short but normally proportioned person (e.g. with growth hormone deficiency), and was used in contrast to dwarf, which denoted disproportionate shortness. Like many other older medical terms, as it became part of popular language it was used in a pejorative sense. When applied to a person who is extremely short, midget is now considered derogatory. The non-offensive term Little person has since replaced midget. See also Lilliput.

During World War II, small submarines such as the British X craft were called midget submarines.

Midget also refers to a sort of smiley or emoticon. A midget emoticon is an emoticon without the nose, and so without the hyphen or caret. Examples include:

:) :( :D :P :!

Note that as of 2004, the instant messaging software programs AOL Instant Messenger and ICQ do not support midget emoticons. The instant messenger Yahoo Messenger does, as does MSN/Windows Messenger.

-Infoplease before/after words:

-before = midge
-after = Mid Glamorgan

-Urbandictionary.com:

Top Vote Getter (hoo boy):

1. midget (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=midget&r=f) : kick ass dwarfed humans. Do not piss midgets off because they will kick your ass and you know it.

I am a midget.

[Personal Note: I linked the above reference because...well...sometimes I make jokes. But not this time. It's also nice to know that the guy who wrote that ninja website is still getting work.]

[Personal Note #2: Now that I've taken the time to look at Vote Getters # 2-10...I don't think we'll need to be linking to urbandictionary.com anymore]


It certainly sounds cool but I'm not sure it would have worked on screen. We would have had a CG midget standing still while a lightsaber fights an old man - I'm practically walking out of the room just thinking about it.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-15-2005, 12:05 AM
Saturday's:

chutzpah

-dictionary.com:

chutzpah also hutzpah

Utter nerve; effrontery: "has the chutzpah to claim a lock on God and morality" (New York Times).

[Yiddish, from Mishnaic Hebrew...to be insolent.]

(Yiddish) unbelievable gall, insolence, audacity.

-Wikipedia.org:

Chutzpah is the quality of audacity for good or for bad. The word derives from the Yiddish khutspe, which in turn derived from the Hebrew חוצפה although current usage is not limited to these communities.

Though originally referring to a negative quality, the word chutzpah has developed some interesting postive connotations in English usage. Whereas in Hebrew chutzpah is used indignantly, to describe someone who has outstepped the boundaries of accepted polite behavior for selfish reasons (i.e. posting a discussion from teh awesomest message boards on the Internets to the front page of your site without linking to the discussion), in English chutzpah can be spoken in admiration of non-conformist but gutsy audacity. Leo Rosten in The Joys of Yiddish defines chutzpah as "gall, brazen nerve, effrontery, incredible 'guts,' presumption plus arrogance such as no other word and no other language can do justice to." (example mine)

The classic definition of chutzpah is generally given as: a boy is on trial for murdering his parents, and he begs of the judge leniency because he is an orphan.

Controversial lawyer Alan Dershowitz entitled his best selling book of essays, Chutzpah, a title many find highly befitting.

Though there are several near-synonyms for chutzpah, none of them capture the particular ambivalent blend of the Yiddish.

Some nice tries:
audacity, effrontery, cheekiness, nerve, daring, gutsiness, hubris, gall, arrogance, presumption, pushiness, attitude, ballsiness (cojones), gumption, brazenness, impudence

-Oh, it's also a deli in Fairfax, Virginia (http://www.chutzpahdeli.com/) for those of you Q23ers meeting in NoVA.


With Robert Asprin’s Myth series, however, the heroes are relatively ordinary people for their world who are thrust into extraordinary situations in which they turn the odds in their favor through some street smarts, chutzpah and a few well-placed cons.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-16-2005, 12:05 AM
Sunday's:

grok

-dictionary.com:

tr. v. [u]Slang[u] grokked, grokking, groks

To understand profoundly through intuition or empathy.

1. To understand, usually in a global sense. Connotes intimate and exhaustive knowledge.

Contrast zen, which is similar supernatural understanding experienced as a single brief flash. See also glark.

2. Used of programs, may connote merely sufficient understanding. "Almost all C compilers grok the 'void' type these days."

-wikipedia.org:

Grok is a verb roughly meaning "to understand completely" or more formally, intuitive understanding. The term originated in Robert A. Heinlein's novel Stranger in a Strange Land, where it is part of the fictional Martian language and introduced to English speakers by a man raised by Martians.

It is primarily used as Slang by science fiction fans, geeks and some pagans, particularly those belonging to the Church of All Worlds but is attested more widely.

In the Martian tongue it literally means "to drink" but is used in a much wider contest. A character in the novel (not the primary user) defines it:

"Grok means to understand so thoroughly that the observer becomes part of the observed--to merge, blend, intermarry, lose identity in group experience. It means almost everything that we mean by religion, philosophy and science--and it means as little to us (because we are from Earth) as color means to a blind man."

-infoplease before and after words:

-before = groining
-after = Grolier


Spock should have a guest appearence, well, cuz I grok Spock.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-17-2005, 02:28 AM
Monday's:

neophyte

-dictionary.com

1. A recent convert to a belief; a proselyte.
2. A beginner or novice: a neophyte at politics.
3. a. Roman Catholic Church. A newly ordained priest.
b. A novice of a religious order or congregation.
4. A Jedi who leaves his training to help his friends, for in danger they are.
5. Something a Jedi might pretend to be to fool Jabba and rescue said friends.

[Middle English, from Late Latin neophytus, from Greek neophutos, neo-, + neo- -phutos, planted (from phuein, to bring forth. See bheu - in Indo-European Roots).]

neophyte

n 1: a plant that is found in an area where it had not been recorded previously 2: any new participant in some activity [syn: newcomer, fledgling, fledgeling, starter, freshman, newbie, entrant] 3: a new convert being taught the principles of Christianity by a catechist [syn: catechumen]

-wikipedia.org:

In general, a neophyte is a novice or beginner.

In Warhammer 40,000 a Neophyte is a Space Marine in training. It is the second stage after a Potential. In the Neophyte stage, implantation, psycho-conditioning, and physical training begin. Each step in this stage has its own dangers, ensuring that only the truly worthy become Space Marines. After several years of training, conditioning and surgeries the Neophyte becomes and Initiate, undertakes his Rites of Fire, and joins other Brother-Marines in the ranks.

-infoplease.com before and after words:

-Before = neo-Pentecostal
-After = neopilina


If you paid attention better during your viewings of RotJ, you'd clearly see that Luke was deliberately misleading Jabba into thinking he was a neophyte and a false Jedi.

-Amanpour

edit: spelling

Kalle
05-17-2005, 04:21 AM
I love wikipedia.

Any dictionary that gives you a Warhammer reference for neophyte is an amazing resource.

Christien Murawski
05-17-2005, 03:28 PM
Something mildly interesting and sort of germane for those who like words:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/winning_non_words

"Jack, you're a grown man. You're in control of your own words."

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-18-2005, 12:56 AM
Tuesday's:

fetish

-dictionary.com:

1. An object that is believed to have magical or spiritual powers, especially such an object associated with animistic or shamanistic religious practices.
2. An object of unreasonably excessive attention or reverence: made a fetish of punctuality.
3. Something, such as a material object or a nonsexual part of the body, that arouses sexual desire and may become necessary for sexual gratification.
4. An abnormally obsessive preoccupation, attachment, or fixation.
5. The need to make Boba Fett the center of the Star Wars universe.

[French fetiche, from Portuguese feitico, artificial, charm, from Latin fact-cius, artificial. See factitious.

-wikipedia.org:

A fetish (from French, fetiche, from Portuguese feitiço, from Latin facticius) is a natural object believed to have supernatural powers, or in particular a thing created by people that has power over people.

>History:
The concept was coined by Charles de Brosses in 1757. de Brosses and other 18th Century scholars used the concept to apply evolution theory to religion. In de Brosses' theory of the evolution of religion, he proposed that fetishism is the earliest (most primitive) stage. This was followed by the stages of polytheism and monotheism, in that order.

>Practice:
Fetishism is mainly a feature of traditional Western African religious beliefs, as well as Voodoo, which is derived from those beliefs.

Blood is often considered a particularly powerful fetish or ingredient in fetishes. In some parts of Africa, the hair of white people was also considered powerful.

>Other uses:
In the Werewolf: The Apocalypse roleplaying system, fetishes are items--often weapons--with spirits bound to them, enabling said items to do extraordinary things. An example would be a pistol with a hawk-spirit that would always shoot the user's target between the eyes.

-Infoplease before/after:

-Before = fetiparous
-After = fetishism

[On a personal note, if you happen to be at work, and you're thinking, "Gee, I'd like to follow up on this word and see what was missed." Um...don't Google it.]


I never got the Boba Fett fetish. It's not like he's totally badass or anything. He follows Solo to Cloud City, calls in the Empire to capture him and then takes a frozen body that can't fight back to Jabba.

Bonus Quote:
Well that's not for us to say. But I can type in say...'sex, fetish'. It takes a little while. There. Two thousand, two hundred, and thirty matches. Just click on one at random. Aaaagh, there. 'Dutch girls must be punished for having big boobs.' Now you don't punish anyone, Dutch or otherwise, for having big boobs.

-Amanpour

BooTx
05-18-2005, 01:02 AM
I like woolgathering occasionally.

Troy S Goodfellow
05-18-2005, 06:37 AM
Whoa. That's 3 words of the day from me.

I guess this is proof that someone reads my posts.

Troy

Christien Murawski
05-18-2005, 11:43 PM
Wednesday's:

continuity

-dictionary.com:

1. The state or quality of being continuous.
2. An uninterrupted succession or flow; a coherent whole.
3. a. A detailed script or scenario consulted to avoid discrepancies from shot to shot in a film, allowing the various scenes to be shot out of order.
b. Spoken matter serving to link parts of a radio or television program so that no break occurs.
4. Why R2's ability to fly in AotC makes perfect sense.

-wikipedia.org:

In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. The term is taken from the mathematical sense of something being smooth and without break. In some forms of media, such as comic books, continuity has also come to mean a set of contiguous events, sometimes said to be "set in the same universe".

Continuity is particularly a concern in the production of film and television due to the difficulty of rectifying an error in continuity after shooting has completed, although it also applies to other art forms, including novels, comics, and animation, though usually on a much broader scale.

[Personal note: if you are at all interested in film (or television for that matter), the Wikipedia page on continuity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuity) is a pretty good read.]

[Personal note Part Deux: for those who are amused by such things, an easy way to find continuity errors is to look up a film on IMDB, then click on "goofs" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0076759/goofs) in the left hand column. I myself stopped being interested in such things when I dropped my sub to Premiere magazine years ago and thus washed my hands of their "Gaffe Squad". However, Gladiator went a long way toward reinstating my interest.]


IMO, he made most of this stuff up as he went along....Also, if he really had all of this planned out for 30 years, wouldn't he have done a better job with some of the basic continuity? And at least come up with a halfway decent plot?

Bonus quote:

Gonk.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-20-2005, 12:17 AM
Thursday's:

perspicacious

-dictionary.com:

Having or showing penetrating mental discernment; clear-sighted. See Synonyms at shrewd.

[From Latin, from perspicere, to look through. See perspective.]

adj. 1: acutely insightful and wise; "much too perspicacious to be taken in by such a spurious argument"; "observant and thoughtful, he was given to asking sagacious questions"; "a source of valuable insights and sapient advice to educators" [syn: sagacious, sapient] 2: mentally acute or penetratingly discerning; "too clear-eyed not to see what problems would follow"; "chaos could be prevented only by clear-sighted leadership" [syn: clear-eyed, clear-sighted] 3: wars not make one great.

-This (http://perspicacious.org/) has nothing to do with anything. But I do like reading these words: "This morning the cat sat on the windowsill and cried as we drove away."

-yourDictionary.com:

Def: Displaying insightful mental capacities and/or shrewd discernment.

Usage: The noun is "perspicacity". A shrewd person has a practical kind of intelligence and a sagacious one has knowledge usually accumulated over time. Perspicacious implies an ability to perceive hidden truths and to understand what puzzles others.


The verdigris little CGI nee muppet bad ass is such the perspicacious contriver of events that a little odd syntax throws everyone off his manipulative little trail.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-21-2005, 03:27 AM
Friday's:

petard

-dictionary.com:

1. A small bell-shaped bomb used to breach a gate or a wall.
2. A loud firecracker.

[French petard, from old French, from peter, to break wind, from pet, a breaking of wind, from Latin peditum, from neuter past participle of pedere, to break wind.]

Word History: The French used petard, "a loud discharge of intestinal gas," for a kind of infernal engine for blasting through the gates of the city. "To be hoist by one's own petard," a now proverbial phrase apparently originating with Shakespeare's Hamlet (around 1604) not long after the word entered English (around 1598), means "to blow oneself up with one's own bomb, to be undone by one's own devices." The French noun pet, "fart," developed regularly from the Latin noun peditum, from the Indo-European root *pezd-, "fart."

-wikipedia.org:

A petard was a medieval term for a small bomb used to blow up gates and walls when breaching fortifications.

It remains in modern usage in the phrase to be hoist by one's own petard, which means to be harmed by one's own plan to harm someone else. Shakespeare used the now proverbial phrase in Hamlet.

*SPOILER WARNING: plot or ending details follow*

In the following passage, the "letters" refer to instructions to be carried sealed to the King of England, by Hamlet, Rosencrantz, and Guildenstern, the latter being two schoolfellows of Hamlet. The letters, as Hamlet suspects, contain a death warrant against Hamlet, who will later open and modify them to instead request the execution of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Engineer refers to a military engineer.

There's letters seal'd: and my two schoolfellows,
Whom I will trust as I will adders fang'd,
They bear the mandate; they must sweep my way
And marshal me to knavery. Let it work;
For 'tis the sport to have the engineer
Hoist with his own petard: and 't shall go hard
But I will delve one yard below their mines
And blow them at the moon: O, 'tis most sweet,
When in one line two crafts directly meet.

After modifying the letters, Hamlet escapes the ship and returns to Denmark.

The verb "hoist" is an irregular past tense of the obsolete verb "hoise," meaning "raise" or "lift." The same form is used in "burn" and "burnt."

The phrase is usually misquoted as "see the engineer hoist by his own petard" and is taken to mean "the hangman hanged with his own rope," or, as in Roadrunner cartoons, a rope, put out to catch something, entangles and hangs the one who set the trap, while the audience "sees" (watches) in amusement.

Hamlet's actual meaning is "cause the bomb maker to be blown into the air with his own bomb," metaphorically turning the tables on Claudius, whose messengers are killed instead of Hamlet.

A modern (1966) play, "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead" was written by Tom Stoppard, containing (imaginatively) all that happens to Rosencrantz and Guildenstern off-stage while Hamlet is ocurring on-stage, including this journey to England. [pn: Originally Stoppard had the Jedi pulling Hamlet's little switheroo trick with Order 66, but Lucas said, "Geez, Tom. Haven't you seen any of the other movies?" To which Stoppard replied, "No...have you?"]


Hoisted by your own petard! :)

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-21-2005, 11:01 PM
Saturday's:

effete

-dictionary.com:

1. Depleted of vitality, force, or effectiveness: the final, effete, period of the baroque style.
2. Marked by self-indulgence, triviality, or decadence: an effete group of self-professed intellectuals.
3. Overrefined; effeminate.
4. No longer productive; infertile.
5. Someone who doesn't like the original trilogie.

-wikipedia.org:

>There's no actual page for effete in the Wikipedia. Pages that mention it include one for Mother's Boy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mother%27s_boy), the film Zulu (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zulu_%28film%29) (Tagline: Dwarfing The Mightiest! Towering Over The Greatest!), the film Mystery Men (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mystery_Men), Spiro Agnew (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiro_Agnew), Stewie Griffin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stewie_Griffin), and, of course, Cucumber sandwich (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cucumber_sandwich).

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1621, from L. effetus (usually in fem. effeta) "unproductive, worn-out (with bearing offspring)" lit. "that has given birth," from ex- "out" + fetus "childbearing, offspring." Sense of "exhausted" is 1662: that of "morally exhausted" (1790) led to "decadent" (19c.).


There's so much humor and comaraderie in them you cant NOT like it.. unless your an effete scrooge that likes overrated movies like Royal Tenenbaums...

-Amanpour

Mike O'Malley
05-22-2005, 06:51 AM
Ramirez was an effete snob! He died on his knees. I took his head and raped his woman before his body was even cold.

Christien Murawski
05-23-2005, 06:57 AM
Sunday's:

pedants

-dictionary.com:

n
1. One who pays undue attention to book learning and formal rules.
2. One who exhibits one's learning and scholarship ostentatiously.
3. Obsolete. A schoolmaster.
4. "I hate to get all legalistic, but I believe it's instructed...not taught."

-wikipedia.org:

>There's no wikipedia page for pedants. However, one of the forms I like is in the entry for Rigour:

Intellectual Rigour can therefore be sometimes seen as the exercise of a skill. It can also degenerate into pedantry, which is intellectual rigor applied to no particular end except self-importance.

>Another fun form of the word from Wikipedia is Pedantagonism. Just typing that word makes me smile:

Pedantagonism is a term coined in the early 21st century by an online community known as Waterpoint. Pedantagonism is the purposeful use of pedantry to provoke an other person.

Example:

Person A: "I'm no good at pedantagonism."
Person B: "I think you mean, 'I'm not good at pedantagonism.'"
Person A: "You jerk!"


Personally, I don't really care whether Palpatine/Sidious/Emperor is Plagueis or not, or whether he can raise the dead or not, but to the non Star Wars pedants among us, it's clear that the movie leaves it ambiguous.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-24-2005, 12:04 AM
Monday's:

archetypal

-dictionary.com:

1. An original model or type after which other similar things are patterned; a prototype: "'Frankenstein'...'Dracula'...'Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde'...Gordon from "West Wing"...the archetypes that have influence all subsequent horror stories." (New York Times...sort of)
2. An ideal example of a type; quintessence: an archetype of the successful entrepreneur.
3. In Jungian psychology, an inherited pattern of thought or symbolic imagery derived from the past collective experience and present in the individual unconscious.
4. The kind of character, esp. in film, that makes plot coherence unnecessary.

-wikipedia.org:

Archetype is defined as the first original model of which all other similar persons, objects, or concepts are merely derivative, copied, patterned, or emulated. The term is often used in literature, architecture, and the arts to refer to something that goes back to the fundamental origins of style, method, gold standard, or physical construct. Shakespeare, for example, is epitomized for popularizing many archetypal characters, not because he was the first that we know of to write them, but because he defined those roles amongst the backdrop of a complex, social literary landscape. Thus, the characters stand out as original by contrast, even though many of his characters were based on previously-garnered archetypes (Shakespeare often borrowed from fables, myths and magic to construct and embellish his plays.)

The imitation process of an archetype or prototype itself is called a pastiche, in which one who mimicks plays homage to the original.

-infoplease before/after words:

Before = archetto
After = archfiend


Can't we just assume that evil machinations from larger-than-life archetypal characters are assumed to occur in "Sadistically and brilliantly evil space" and move on to the pretty light shows? Especially for something like a space opera?

-Amanpour

500

Christien Murawski
05-25-2005, 01:04 AM
Tuesday's:

affected

-dictionary.com

tr. v.
1. To have an influence on or effect a change in: Inflation affects the buying power to the dollar.
2. To act on the emotions of; touch or move.
3. To attack or infect, as a disease: Rheumatic fever can affect the heart.

[n]
1. Feeling or emotion, especially as manifested by facial expressions or body language: "The soldiers seen on television had been carefully chosen for blandness of affect" (Norman Mailer).
2. Obsolete. A disposition, feeling, or tendency.

affect(2)

tr. v.
1. To put on a false show of; simulate: affected a British accent.
2. a. To have or show a liking for: affects dramatic clothes
b. Archaic. To fancy; love.
3. To tend to by nature; tend to assume: a substance that affects crystalline form.
4. To imitate; copy: "Spencer, in affecting the ancients, writ no language" (Ben Jonson).

>and now for the money shot...

affected

adj.
1. Assumed or simulated to impress others: an affected accent
2. Speaking or behaving in an artificial way to make an impression.
3. Disposed or inclined.
4. Ending your posts with a quote then following that quote with your nickname.


It's very affected.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-26-2005, 01:17 AM
Wednesday's:

meme

-dictionary.com:

A unit of cultural information, such as a cultural practice or idea, that is transmitted verbally or by repeated action from one mind to another.

[Shortening (modeled on gene), of mimeme from Greek mimema, something imitated, from mimesthai, to imitate. See mimesis.]

A cultural unit (an idea or value or pattern of behavior) that is passed from one generation to another by nongenetic means (as by imitation); "memes are the cultural counterpart of genes".

-wikipedia.org:

The term and concept of meme (pronounced [miːm] in IPA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet_for_English); from the Greek word for "memory) was introduced by Richard Dawkins in 1976 in his book The Selfish Gene. Though Dawkins defined the meme as "a unit of cultural transmission, or a unit of imitation," memeticists vary in their definitions of meme, and the lack of a consistent, rigorous definition of what precisely a meme is is one of the principle criticisms leveled at memetics, the study of memes.

Different definitions of the meme generally agree, very roughly, that a meme is some sort of a self-propagating unit of cultural evolution having a resemblence to the gene (unit of genetics). Dawkins introduced the term after writing that evolution depended not on the particular chemical basis of genetics, but only on the existence of a self-replicating unit of transmission--in the case of evolution, the gene. For Dawkins, the meme is an example of another self-replicating unit, and most importantly, one which he thought would be very useful in explaining human behavior and cultural evolution.

In casual use, the term meme usually refers to any piece of information passed from one mind to another. This usage most closely resembles the analogy of "language as a virus" than Dawkins' analogy of memes as replicating units. This definition has become popularly used on the Internet to refer to phenomena such as "All your base are belong to us" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_your_base_are_belong_to_us) and "Icy Hot Stuntaz" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icy_Hot_Stuntaz).


QT3 meme threads

Bonus Quote:

the meme ain't working. your cheap empire apologist mind tricks don't work here.

-Amanpour

BrewersDroop
05-26-2005, 11:01 AM
Just want to say, keep it up Amanpour. I check this thread every day!

Christien Murawski
05-27-2005, 12:24 AM
Thursday's:

douchebag

Also spelled douche bag

-dictionary.com:

1. A small syringe with detachable nozzles; used for vaginal lavage and enemas.
2. Tom Cruise.

-wikipedia.org:

A Douche (French for "shower") in American English generally describes a stream of water or a device used to introduce a stream of water into the body for medical or "sanitary" reasons. In other languages douche only has the French meaning of shower. In the US English sense, it is similar to an enema, however the term is used colloquially to apply to the use in the vagina of women. A douche bag is a piece of equipment used for douching.

Vaginal douching has a variety of perceived benefits. In addition to promising to clean the vagina of unwanted odors, it can also be used by women who wish to have intercourse during menstruation, in order to avoid blood smearing the penis. In the past, douching was also used after intercourse as a method of contraception though it is not very effective. [Personal Note: I remember my dad telling me that when he was in high school, kids used Coca-Cola for this purpose; apparently the bottle shape and the fizzing power of the carbonation made its use...um...convenient. It was called a Coca-Cola douche. I think my dad intended this to be a cautionary tale.]

>..."Skip a bit brother..."

The practice of douching is now largely restricted to North America, where douching equipment is available in pharmacies.

Slang uses

The terms douche bag and douche for short are also popular derogatory terms of insult or ridicule. These terms can mean a variety of insults, and have become popular in the comedic media (for instance, comic and The Daily Show host Jon Stewart once named conservative columnist and television pundit Robert Novak as a "douche bag of liberty"):

-Someone who is annoying, bossy or embarrassing.
-Someone who is stupid, intellectually challenged or mentally deranged but less than clinically insane.
-Someone who is unintelligently lying or scamming.
-Someone who is arrogant, elitist, or snobby.

-infoplease.com before and after words:

-Before = douche (of course)
-After = Doug (WTF?)


Tom Cruise is a douchebag

-Amanpour

Bull
05-27-2005, 08:25 AM
Just want to say, keep it up Amanpour. I check this thread every day!

Yes, I am drawn to this thread every day. You should keep it up Amanpour. We should find a way to get email notification when the new word comes out. Actually I think we have this functionality. Maybe we should find a way to post it on the main page.

Christien Murawski
05-28-2005, 04:06 AM
Friday's:

polemic

-dictionary.com:

1. A controversial argument, especially one refuting or attacking a specific opinion or doctrine.
2. A person engaged in, or inclined to, controversy, argument, or refutation.
3. The universe hangs in the balance while we debate whether the Empire killed millions or billions.

adj. also polemical
Of or relating to a controversy, argument, or refutation.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

The noun polemic has two senses in WordNet:

1. polemicist, polemist, polemic: -- (a writer who argues in oppostion to others (especially in theology))
2. polemic -- (a controvesy (especially over a belief or dogma))

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1638, "controversial argument or discussion," from Greek polemikos "warlike, belligerent," from polemos "war." Meaning "one who writes in opposition to another" is attested from 1680.

"The worst offense that can be commited by a polemic is to stigmatize those who hold a contrary opinion as bad and immoral men." [John Stuart Mill, 1806-73]

>Board Example:

And if you actually think that "I will kill you if you don't move out of my community because you're black," should be protected speech under the Bill of Rights, you are the stupidest motherfucker on the board.

Polemicize is recorded from 1953-

-wikipedia.org:

Polemic is the art or practice of disputation or controversy, as in religious, philosophical, or political matters. As such a polemic text on a document is written specifically to refute or dispute that topic.

The antonym of a polemic source is an apology.

Polemic is also a branch of theology pertaining to the history or conduct of ecclesiastical controversy.


So it's only polemic exaggeration when the other guy says it. Got it.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-28-2005, 11:27 PM
Saturday's:

pablum

-dictionary.com:

Trite, insipid, or simplistic writing, speech, or conceptualization. "We have to settle for the pablum that passes for the inside dope." (Julie Salmon)

-wikipedia.org:

Pablum was a cereal for infants marketed by the Mead Johnson Corporation. Invented in 1930 by three Canadian pediatricians Frederick Tisdall, Theodore Drake, and Alan Brown, Pablum marked a breakthrough in nutritional science. Although it was not the first food designed and sold specifically for babies, it was more popular and successful than prior products in an era when infant malnutrition was still a problem in industrialized countries.

Pablum was made from a mixture of ground and precooked wheat, oat, and corn meals, as well as bone meal, yeast, and alfafa. It provided minerals and vitamins A, B1, B2, D and E while being palatable, easily digestible, and not causing side effects like diarrhea or constipation.

A royalty on every package sold went to the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto [gosh!] where Tisdall, Drake, and Brown were doctors.

Rhetorical Usage
In lower case, the word pablum is often used to indicate anything bland or oversimplified, especially a work of literature or speech. This usage predates the invention of the cereal.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

pabulum

"food," 1678, from L. pabulum "fodder, food," from PIE base *pa "to protect, feed" (see food) +instrumentive suffix *dhlom. Pablum (1932), derived from this, is a trademark (Mead Johnson & Co.) for a soft, bland cereal used as food for weak and invalid people, hence fig. use (attested from 1970, first by U.S. Vice President Spiro Agnew) in ref. to "mushy" political prose.

-Infoplease before/after words:

-Before = Pablo
-After = pabulum


It's a sad day when I'm ready for some good Hollywood pablum and I can't even get that from Hollywood.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-30-2005, 01:52 AM
Sunday's:

ad hominem

Appealing to personal considerations rather than to logic or reason: Debaters should avoid ad hominem arguments that question their opponents' motives.

Usage Note: As the principle meaning of the preposition ad suggests, the homo of ad hominem was originally the person to whom an argument was addressed, not its subject. The phrase denoted an argument designed to appeal to the listener's emotions rather than to reason...This usage appears to be waning...The phrase now chiefly describes an argument based on the failings of an adversary rather than on the merits of the case: Ad hominem attacks on one's opponent are a tried-and-true strategy for people who have a case that's weak. Ninety percent of the Panel finds this sentence acceptable. The expression now also has a looser use in referring to any personal attack, whether or not it is part of an argument, as in It isn't in the best interests of the nation for the press to attack him in this personal, ad hominem way. This use is acceptable to 65 percent of the panel. -Ad hominem also recently acquired a use as a noun denoting personal attacks, as in "Notwithstanding all the ad hominem, Gingrich insists that he and Panetta can work together" (Washington Post). This usage may raise some eyebrows, though it appears to be gaining ground in journalistic style.

-wikipedia.org:

An ad hominem argument, also known as argumentum ad hominem (Latin, literally "argument [aimed] at the person" but usually translated as "argument to the man"), is a logical fallacy that involves replying to an argument or assertion addressing the person presenting the argument or assertion rather than the argument itself or an argument pointing out an inconsistency between a view expressed by an individual and the remainder of his or her beliefs.

Ad hominem as logical fallacy

A traditional, regular (fallacious) argument was identified by Aristotle in his On Sophistical Refutations and has the basic form:

Regular Ad Hominem

1. A makes claim B;
2. there is something objectionable about A,
3. therefore claim B is false.

[Personal Note: I'd like to put in the next paragraph because it has the word fallacymonger in it, but as I've just typed the word, I'm not going to bother.]

Ad hominem is one of the best known of the logical fallacies usually enumerated in introductory logic and critical thinking textbooks. Both the fallacy itself, and the accusations of having committed it, are often brandished in actual discourse. As a technique of rhetoric, it is powerful and used often, despite its lack of subtlety.

Subtypes
Three traditionally identified varieties include ad hominem abusive, ad hominem circumstantial, and ad hominem tu quoque.

[Personal Note II: I'd love to include more of the entry from Wikipedia, because it's such good, juicy stuff, but this is already getting too long. You can go find it if you care.]

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1599, from L., literally "to a man," from ad "to" + hominem, acc. of homo "man."

-Infoplease before/after words:

-Before = ad hockery
-After = adiabat


What I'm bitching about is the shockingly low level of debate here. Ad hominem isn't just treated like a valid rhetorical device, it's THE debate tool of choice for you guys.


The comments about Gordon's past behavior in NASCAR, by the way, do not constitute "ad hominem" attacks. It is relevant information, presented in an attempt to explain to someone as clueless about the sport as yourself...


Robbie Gordon is both wrong AND dumb. He isn't dumb because he's wrong, or wrong because he's dumb, which would actually be an ad hominem. His point is simply invalid, and he's dumb for trying to make it...



Ignat- You have absolutely no idea what ad hominem means, do you?

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
05-31-2005, 12:40 AM
Monday's:

tendentious

-dictionary.com:

Marked by a strong, implicit point of view; partisan: a tendentious account of recent elections.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

1. tendentious, tendencious -- (having or marked by a strong tendency especially a controversial one; "a tendentious account of recent elections"; "distinguishing between verifiable fact and tendentious assertion")

-askoxford.com:

calculated to promote a particular cause or point of view

Derivatives tendentiously (adverb) tendentiousness (noun)

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1628 from M.L. tendentia "inclination, learning," from L. tendens, prp. of tendere "to stretch, to aim" (see tenet). Tendentious is recorded from 1900, after Ger. tendenziös.


"You really do not want to read anything by Michel Foucault, unless your idea of a grand time is wading through yet more swampy French prose by a chap who has very little to say and takes whole days out of your life to mumble through it. Think of Sartre at his most tendentious, or of Derrida in any conext, only without the crisp, breath-taking pace."

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-01-2005, 02:04 AM
Tuesday's:

ding-dong

-dictionary.com:
n.

1. The peel of a bell.
2. Slang. An empty-headed person; a fool.

intr. v. ding-donged, ding-donging, ding-dongs

To ring; jingle.

adj.

Characterized by a hammering exchange, as of blows; a ding-dong fight.

-wikipedia.org

>no entry in Wikipedia, but it is referenced under the entry for Kekeke (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kekeke).

Kekeke is a Korean term to indicate a cackling type of laughter. It is a recent term that appears to have spread because of its use in text-based chat.

It is an example of an onomatopoeic word--one that imitates the sound it describes, such as the English words "moo" and "ding-dong".

The phrase "Zerg rush kekeke" has become popular in parodying Koreans playing Starcraft.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

adv.

1. dingdong -- (heartily or earnestly, "They fell to work dingdong.")

-Infoplease Before/After words:

>Before = dingbat
>after = dinge

Infoplease also has this as its #3 definition:

3. Slang. ding-a-ling.



Well for you not to be a ding-dong, but that's probably too much to ask.

My apologies to everybody else...that looked like the exact same article I saw on CNN earlier that simply repeated the fact that Felt claimed he was Deep Throat.

I just didn't actually "read" the article though.


-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-01-2005, 10:24 PM
Wednesday's:

straw man

-dictionary.com:

1. A person who is set up as cover or a front for a questionable enterprise.
2. An argument or opponent set up so as to be easily refuted or defeated.
3. A bundle of straw made into the likeness of a man and often used as a scarecrow.

-Merriam Webster's Dictionary of Law:

: an intermediary for a transaction (as a conveyance of real property)

-Wikipedia.org:

A straw man or man of straw is a dummy in the shape of a human created by stuffing straw into clothes. Straw men are used as scarecrows, combat-training targets or swordsmiths test targets, effigies to be burned, and as rodeo dummies to distract bulls.

As a rhetorical term, "straw man" describes a point of view that was created in order to be easily defeated in argument; the creator of a "straw man" argument does not accurately reflect the best arguments of his or her opponents, but instead sidesteps or mischaracterizes them so as to make the opposing view appear weak or ridiculous.

One can set up a straw man in several different ways:

1. Present only a portion of the opponent's arguments (often a weak one), refute it, and pretend that all of their arguments have been refuted.
2. Present the opponent's argument in weakened form, refute it, and pretend the original has been refuted.
3. Present a misrepresentation of the opponent's opinion, refute it, and pretend the opponent's actual position has been refuted.
4. Present someone who defends a position poorly as the defender, refute their arguments, and pretend that every argument for that position has been refuted.
5. Invent a fictitious persona with actions or beliefs that are criticized, and pretend that the person represents a group that the speaker is critical of.

Some logic textbooks define the straw man fallacy only as a misrepresentation argument. It is now common, however, to use the term to refer to all of these tactics. The straw-man technique is also used as a form of media manipulation.

Straw man in Law

The term straw man can refer to a third party that acts as a "front" in a transaction for the purpose of taking title to real property or some other kind of transaction where the principal remains hidden or to do something else which is not allowed. A straw man is also "a person of no means," or one who deliberately accepts a liability or other monetary responsibility without the resources to fulfill it, usually to shield another party.

At one time, men of straw were men that could be found in the courts who placed a piece of straw in their shoes (also called straw shoes). Jurists knew that these men of straw were available to testify for a price, and they would be asked leading questions: Don't you remember that you saw him at the market at the time of the murder? And the straw-shoe's rejoinder would be: yes. Then the straw-shoes would perjure himself for a price in court, just as the jurist has so cleverly (but fraudulently) suggested.


Wow, way to go Straw Man. Yes, yes, we're all saying that child killers are fucking heroes. Gimme a break.

Bonus Quote:

Did you really bust my balls about strawman arguments right after typing this? I find your use of the word "incredibly" incredible, incidentally.

Double Bonus Quote:

It hasn't happened with WOOPWOOPWOOP STRAWMAN ALERT nonfamous mothers who have threatened to do so, been ignored and wound up killing their children. Do you see how something doesn't quite add up properly with Shields' story? I don't know who is to blame, but motherfucking somebody is.

Triple Dog Dare Bonus Quote:

Here's a similar story. It's not a fucking strawman either, Label Boy, so knock it off.

And One Final Bonus Quote:

Must've hit pretty close to the mark to get her all riled up like that, huh kid?"

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-03-2005, 12:38 AM
Thursday's:

rendition

-dictionary.com:

1. The act of rendering.
2. An interpretation of a musical score or a dramatic piece.
3. A performance of a musical or dramatic work.
4. A translation, often interpretive.
5. A surrender.
6. Getting other countries to torture our prisoners for us: priceless.

[Obsolete French, from Old French rendre, see render.]

-Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Law:

1: The act or result of rendering <the court's rendition of judgment>
2: extradition of a fugitive who has fled to another state

-Wikipedia.org:

Rendition is the practice of clandestine capture and extradition of individual suspects outside the country in which they were caught. It is a legal term, used euphemistically, by the United States by the Central Intelligence Agency and the United States Government to publicly discuss these activities. Suspects are moved to third countries for the purposes of detention, interrogation, and, it is alleged, torture.

The CIA was granted permission to use rendition in a presidential directive that dates back to the Clinton Administration, although very few uses were documented during that time. The practice has grown sharply since the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Its legality remains highly controversial, as the United States outlaws the use of torture, and its Constitution guarantees due process.


Human Rights groups charge that rendition is a violation of the United Nations Convention on Torture, because suspects are taken to countries where torture during interrogation remains legal, thus circumventing the protections the captives would enjoy in the United States or other nations in the West. Additionally, many are arrested without charges and deprived of legal counsel.

A Gulfstream V jet owned by Premier Executive Transport Services, with tail number N379P, has been reported in numerous countries and airports, and is suspected of playing a key role in current and ongoing CIA renditions.

SEE ALSO:

Extraordinary rendition (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extraordinary_rendition): discusses rendition used allegedly for the purposes of moving CIA detainees to countries where torture is legal.

[Personal Note: The New Yorker had a great article on rendition (http://www.newyorker.com/fact/content/articles/050214fa_fact6) a couple months ago.]

-Infoplease before/after words:

-Before = rendezvous
-After = Renee


This Adminstration -- the one you're zealously defending -- is most certainly not living up to the standards I expect from my government: rendition, lack of due process, avoiding accountability, fostering a culture of abuse, and torture have all been brought to light as a shameful part of how we're handling prisoners in this bullshit war on terror (i.e. invasion of Iraq).

-Amanpour

Bitterman
06-03-2005, 01:41 PM
Everything Else

This is a term which means everything not included in the previously mentioned catagories. So "Everything Else would not include topics such as games, books, movies, politics/religion, or technical talk.

Bull
06-03-2005, 01:43 PM
But what if it is Everything Else and hardware?

Peter Frazier
06-03-2005, 04:50 PM
I am a dick
Fixed it for you.

Bull
06-03-2005, 07:01 PM
Hostility

Bitterman
06-03-2005, 07:04 PM
Look at me, I'm smart or something!


Sir, may I be the first to congratulate you on your stunningly subtle wit? Truly, that post was the penultimate in evocation of pre-Austrolopithicine, or prehaps pre-anthropocene intellect. But I prefer to paraphrase the famous playwrite or prime minister, and say to you that yes, sir, I might be an asshole. Unfortunately for your point, which I can honestly claim was the height of witty put-downs (At least in your Junior High School where you are no doubt the serve-artist par excellence), I can perform random acts of kindness and empathy, whilst you will remain a half-witted lickspittle, barring invention of the Flowers-for-Algernon surgery you seemingly need so dearly.

Ot to put it in words you can understand, good try, but calling me a dick isn't going to hurt me, nor will it impress the cheerleaders.

Raife
06-03-2005, 08:36 PM
http://www.morsa.net/words.gifwords

I skipped that first paragraph because it smelled like cabbage, but I'm going to second Peter's motion that you are being a dick.

As for cheerleaders, Doug Henning's ghost is also solidly in the You are being a dick camp. EAT THAT, BITTERBOY!
http://www.morsa.net/dougfire.jpg

Bitterman
06-03-2005, 10:32 PM
The motion is on the floor. All in favor of finding that Bitterman is being a dick? Aye. Motion carried, Bitterman is a dick. The committee, finding Bitterman to be a dick, enters into its bylaws that Bitterman doesn't care if he's being a dick, because the word of the day keeps becoming less and less interesting and more and more politically moticated.

Motion passed, and shall henceforth be known as the STFU Wankers ruling 01-2005.
Meeting adjourned.

Bull
06-03-2005, 10:36 PM
the word of the day keeps becoming less and less interesting and more and more politically moticated.


Well, when you start out with cornhole, you really have no where to go but toward boring words. In a few years, the word of the day might actually be as bland as toward.

Raife
06-03-2005, 10:50 PM
http://www.morsa.net/words.gif

http://www.morsa.net/words.gif

Shh! Some of us are trying to watch Word of the Day.

Bull
06-03-2005, 10:52 PM
Misquote, misquote!! I said no such thing

Christien Murawski
06-04-2005, 12:23 AM
Friday's:

penultimate

-dictionary.com:

1. Next to last.
2. Linguistics. Of or relating to the penult of a word: penultimate stress.

-wiktionary.org:

1. The next-to-last in a series. For example, in a series of events, the penultimate event is the one which precedes the final event.
2. Recently, penultimate has been used to mean really good.

Synonyms:

-next-to-last
-second last

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1677, from earlier penultima (n.) "the next to the last syllable of a word or verse," from fem. of L. adj. penultimus "next-to-last," from pæne "almost" + ultimus "final."


Truly, that post was the penultimate in evocation of pre-Austrolopithicine, or prehaps pre-anthropocene intellect.

-Amanpour

shift6
06-04-2005, 12:27 AM
...because the word of the day keeps becoming less and less interesting and more and more politically moticated...
I agree. Why, it was only three WOTD's ago that "ding dong", itself a word that encompasses entire realms of political thought, was spotlighted.

Tom Chick
06-04-2005, 02:31 AM
the word of the day keeps becoming less and less interesting and more and more politically moticated.

Says you! The Qt3 Word of the Day, much like Bierce's Devil's Dictionary, or more recently John Ralston Saul's Doubter's Companion, is a format for the writer to express his opinions. That's partly what makes it interesting. That it's gotten you into a high dudgeon is just gravy.

-Tom

Old Man Gravy
06-04-2005, 07:09 AM
What?

shift6
06-04-2005, 09:27 AM
Tom's bucking for another word with "dudgeon". Ha! Cheater.

Troy S Goodfellow
06-04-2005, 09:29 AM
dudgeon - a portmanteau word that combines "bludgeon" with dungeon", it means to lock someone in your basement and beat them with sacks of oranges.

Troy

Tom Chick
06-04-2005, 12:48 PM
Troy, you really should leave the Qt3 WOTD to the professionals.

Besides, as if Bitterman's post was bucking for a WOTD! I'm just disappointed that Amanpour fell for it by choosing 'penultimate' over 'anthropocene'.

-Tom

Bull
06-04-2005, 07:51 PM
I am just glad I got my copy of Encarta dictionary installed. Otherwise I would never be able to pronounce any of this. Do you guys every use these words in actual conversation, or is this all just ment for text?

Christien Murawski
06-04-2005, 08:20 PM
I'm just disappointed that Amanpour fell for it by choosing 'penultimate' over 'anthropocene'.

That was for spacemonkey. It's his favorite malappropriated word.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-05-2005, 12:54 AM
Saturday's:

effluvia

-dictionary.com:

pl. of effluvium

1. A usually invisible emanation or exhalation, as of vapor or gas.
2. a. A byproduct or residue; waste.
b. The odorous fumes given off by waste or decaying matter.
3. An impalpable emanation; an aura.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1646, from L. effluvium "a flowing out," from effluere (see effluence).

-Infoplease before/after words:

-Before = effluent
-After = eflux

-Online Plain Text English Dictionary (basically the same as above, I just like the wording):

Subtile or invisible emanation; exhalation perceived by the sense of smell; especially noisome or noxious exhalation; as, the effluvium of diseased or putrefying bodies, or from ill drainage.

-ditto Webster's 1828:

The minute and often invisible particles which exhale from most, if not all terrestrial bodies, such as the odor or smell of plants, and the noxious exhalations from diseased bodies or putrefying animal or vegetable substances.

-Stedman's Medical Dictionary:

Shedding of hair.


Random effluvia

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-06-2005, 01:10 AM
Sunday's:

torture

-dictionary.com:

n.

1. a. Infliction of severe physical pain as a means of punisment or coercion.
b. An instrument or a method for inflicting such pain.
2. Excruciating physical or mental pain; agony: the torture of waiting in suspense.
3. Something causing severe pain or anguish.

tr. v.

1. To subject (a person or an animal) to torture.
2. To bring great physical or mental pain upon another.
3. Something causing severe pain and anguish.

-Wikipedia.org:

Torture is the infliction of severe physical or psychological pain as an expression of cruelty, a means of intimidation, deterrant or punishment, as a tool for the extraction of information or confessions.

Torture is an extreme violation of human rights. Signatories of the Third Geneva Convention and Fourth Geneva Convention agree not to torture protected persons (enemy civilians and POWs) in armed conflicts, and signatories of the UN Convention Against Torture agree to not intentionally inflict severe pain or suffering on anyone, to obtain information or a confession, to punish them, or to coerce them or a third person. These conventions and agreements notwithstanding, it is estimated by organisations such as Amnesty International that around 2/3 of countries do not consistently abide by the spirit of such treaties.

Current Legal Status of Torture

On December 10, 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly. Article 5 states "No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment".

Since that time the use of torture has been regulated by a number of international treaties, of which the two major ones are the United Nations Convention Against Terror and the Geneva Conventions.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

c. 1495 (implied in torturous) from M. Fr. torture "infliction of great pain, great pain, agony," from L.L. torture "a twisting, writhing, torture, torment," from stem of L. torquere. The verb is 1588, from the noun. Torturous "full of twists" is recorded from 1426.


If torture is so bad (and I believe it is, although I disagree on some definitions of the word itself), then it doesn't matter whether 1% or 100% of the detainees are actually good intelligence assets. Torture isn't justified just because the victim has good info.

Bonus Quote:
They never even asked me any questions.

-Amanpour

edit: spelling

Bitterman
06-06-2005, 09:32 AM
I'm just disappointed that Amanpour fell for it by choosing 'penultimate' over 'anthropocene'.

That was for spacemonkey. It's his favorite malappropriated word.

-Amanpour

Just in case you misunderstood, BTW, the use of penultimate was meant in the sense of "second best", as in the second most egregious example of stupidity. The first, or ultimate example has a line to post ratio of less than 2:1.

spacemonkey
06-06-2005, 10:08 AM
I'm just disappointed that Amanpour fell for it by choosing 'penultimate' over 'anthropocene'.

That was for spacemonkey. It's his favorite malappropriated word.

-Amanpour


...your vigilance has not gone unnoticed. Thanks for fighting the good fight, Xtien!

spacemonkey
06-06-2005, 10:13 AM
I'm just disappointed that Amanpour fell for it by choosing 'penultimate' over 'anthropocene'.

That was for spacemonkey. It's his favorite malappropriated word.

-Amanpour

Just in case you misunderstood, BTW, the use of penultimate was meant in the sense of "second best", as in the second most egregious example of stupidity. The first, or ultimate example has a line to post ratio of less than 2:1.

Nice try.

But, in the plus column, I doubt you'll misuse the word again.

...so there's that, at least.

Bitterman
06-06-2005, 10:52 AM
No, I used it correctly in the first place. Which I suppose is some sort of redeeming point of word of the day, since perhaps it can educate people as to the subtle nuances of my verbiage. And I have witnesses as to my meaning, so there.

spacemonkey
06-06-2005, 10:57 AM
No, I used it correctly in the first place. Which I suppose is some sort of redeeming point of word of the day, since perhaps it can educate people as to the subtle nuances of my verbiage. And I have witnesses as to my meaning, so there.

Would any of these witnesses care to wiegh in?

Nick Walter
06-06-2005, 11:05 AM
No, I used it correctly in the first place. Which I suppose is some sort of redeeming point of word of the day, since perhaps it can educate people as to the subtle nuances of my verbiage. And I have witnesses as to my meaning, so there.

Would any of these witnesses care to wiegh in?

Smells like revisionism to me.

Bitterman
06-06-2005, 12:00 PM
Well, you can either believe that I meant he was the second most fucking annoying poster, or you can simply call me a liar. Either one is fine with me.

I suppose I should have added "surpassed only by a certain ding-dong saying jackass".

This should make it a bit more obvious :http://www.quartertothree.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=407503&highlight=spoofy#407503

As for what you smell, Nick, well, given your constant inability to make a cogent point and your utter failure to demonstrate the most rudimentary grasp of logic or common sense, well, let me just say "Whatever".

Nick Walter
06-06-2005, 12:10 PM
Well, you can either believe that I meant he was the second most fucking annoying poster, or you can simply call me a liar. Either one is fine with me.

I suppose I should have added "surpassed only by a certain ding-dong saying jackass".

This should make it a bit more obvious :http://www.quartertothree.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=407503&highlight=spoofy#407503

As for what you smell, Nick, well, given your constant inability to make a cogent point and your utter failure to demonstrate the most rudimentary grasp of logic or common sense, well, let me just say "Whatever".

A person who makes a point of crafting a QT3 persona that falls somewhere between "annoying asshole" and "deliberate dick" shouldn't expect an outpouring of public support after making a public fool of themself.

Bitterman
06-06-2005, 12:13 PM
At least I had to try. The description "Bumbling idiot" comes naturally to you.

Peter Frazier
06-06-2005, 01:32 PM
I still think that you sound smarter and more succinct when I edit your messages.

Bill Dungsroman
06-06-2005, 01:37 PM
Well, you can either believe that I meant he was the second most fucking annoying poster, or you can simply call me a liar. Either one is fine with me.

I suppose I should have added "surpassed only by a certain ding-dong saying jackass".

This should make it a bit more obvious :http://www.quartertothree.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=407503&highlight=spoofy#407503

As for what you smell, Nick, well, given your constant inability to make a cogent point and your utter failure to demonstrate the most rudimentary grasp of logic or common sense, well, let me just say "Whatever".

A person who makes a point of crafting a QT3 persona that falls somewhere between "annoying asshole" and "deliberate dick" shouldn't expect an outpouring of public support after making a public fool of themself.

:cry:

MikeSofaer
06-06-2005, 04:10 PM
A person who makes a point of crafting a QT3 persona that falls somewhere between "annoying asshole" and "deliberate dick" shouldn't expect an outpouring of public support after making a public fool of themself.
Is "themself" really in usage now? Because its very existence makes me want to cry.

DrCrypt
06-06-2005, 04:20 PM
Apparently, it's extremely popular among the pedantic grammarian hypocrite set. For the grammatic plebiscite, however, it's still "himself" or "herself".

Tom Chick
06-06-2005, 04:38 PM
Let's not forget "hisself", which I don't think gets enough props.

-Tom

Bren
06-06-2005, 05:25 PM
Their selves is also awesome.

shift6
06-06-2005, 06:08 PM
Then there's "yo'self", as in "check yo'self, niggah!"

Bill Dungsroman
06-06-2005, 10:39 PM
Their selves is also awesome.

The late, great, Eazy-E was quoted using "theyselves." Which I exceused because it was an article about how Eazy put a lot of money back into his ol' Compton neighborhood, and he was dissin' on the brothas that don't.

Christien Murawski
06-07-2005, 01:21 AM
Monday's:

zoftig

also spelled zaftig

-dictionary.com:

1. Full-bosomed.
2. Having a full, shapely figure.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

1. buxom, chubby, embonpoint, plump, zaftig, zoftig -- (euphemism for slightly fat; "a generation ago...buxom actresses were popular" -- Robt. A. Hamilton; "chubby babies"; "pleasantly plump")

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

zaftig

"alluringly plump, curvaceous, buxom," 1937, from Yiddish zaftik, lit. "juicy," from zaft "juice," from M.H.G. [Middle High German] saft "juice" (see sap).

-infoplease before/after words:

[Personal Note: I swear I'm not making this up]

zoftig

Before = zoetrope
After = Zog I

zaftig

Before = zaffer
After = zag

-links:

>um...okay...NSFW (http://archive.salon.com/sex/feature/2001/06/18/zaftig/). Weird, yeah I know. I was just casting about for links. And if any site says the bottom of page one of its article..."I licked my lips and could taste her"...I'd have to say it's worth a look.

>I have no idea what this site is about: http://www.halfzaftig.com/ Maybe it's just an extremely laid back spam site that expects us all to come to it.

>I hate to say it, because it's the WOTD equivalent to saying I watch "Gilmore Girls", but this site (http://www.myfavoriteword.com/Z.html) just has a great feel. And a great feel for words.


Bring back zoftig babes! Enough of these frickin' scarecrows!

-Amanpour

>edit for spelling

Bill Dungsroman
06-07-2005, 07:06 AM
>um...okay...NSFW (http://archive.salon.com/sex/feature/2001/06/18/zaftig/). Weird, yeah I know. I was just casting about for links. And if any site says the bottom of page one of its article..."I liked my lips and could taste her"...I'd have to say it's worth a look.

You'd be wrong. That was easily the most SFW NSFW link ever.

Nellie
06-07-2005, 07:32 AM
I'm still not clicking on a URL with /sex/ in it from a work machine, I forgot my tinfoil hat today.

DrCrypt
06-07-2005, 07:57 AM
A month and a half later and Xtien finally manages to highlight an interesting, non-pedestrian word... courtesy of ugsome idiot Midnight Son, of all people.

Congratulations, Xtien - you finally found a word unhighlighted in the average Gomer Pyle TV guide show synopsis.

Bull
06-07-2005, 08:48 AM
The crowd became restless. Suddenly XtienMurawski realized this word of the day stuff was serious business.

Christien Murawski
06-08-2005, 12:29 AM
Tuesday's:

poltroon

-dictionary.com:

n.

1. A base coward: "Every moment of the fashion industry's misery is richly deserved by the designers...and magazine poltroons who perpetrate this absurd creation." (Nina Totenberg)
2. One of the best old-school Looney Toons insults ever. (Bill Dungsroman)

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

adj: characterized by a complete cowardliness
n an abject coward [syn: craven, recreant]

-American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language:

[French poltron, from Old Italian poltrone, coward, idler, perhaps augmentative of poltro, unbroken colt (from Vulgar Latin *pulliter, from Latin pullus, young animal. See pau- in Indo-European Roots), or from poltro, bed, lazy.]


I goddamn dare you to come to me face to face this way. I fucking well dare you.

Chickenshit poltroon.

Bonus Quote:

What the hell is a poltroon?

-Amanpour

Rywill
06-08-2005, 05:58 AM
I like that because it makes it look like Andrew is crazy, rather than that bicycling guy.

Talisker
06-08-2005, 06:18 AM
I like that because it makes it look like Andrew is crazy, rather than that bicycling guy.
Ry, I strongly suggest you avoid crossing my path for the rest of your days. Better yet, I strongly suggest you do not let me discover your real identity and location, and that if I do, you are far enough away that it is too much trouble to confront you in person.

(c.f. qt3 (http://www.quartertothree.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=19437&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=) and original (http://tinyurl.com/a6kck))

shift6
06-08-2005, 06:04 PM
Andrew Myers: word of the day and a side sudo-chop in one!

Bull
06-08-2005, 06:06 PM
Mr Myers better watch out because while Rywill may seem like a wimpy lawyer type fellow from his posts, I happen to know that by night he is a nasty biker dude, with black leather chaps and everything. :)

Rywill
06-08-2005, 07:37 PM
AND NOT IN A GAY WAY. Not that there is anything wrong with that.

Christien Murawski
06-09-2005, 01:17 AM
Wednesday's:

esoteric

-dictionary.com:

1. a. Intended for or understood by only a specific group: an esoteric cult. See synonyms at mysterious.
b. Of or relating to that which is known by a restricted number of people.
2. a. Confined to a small group: esoteric interests.
b. Not publically disclosed; confidential.
3. How a troll keeps you on your toes.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

1. esoteric (vs. exoteric) -- (confined to and understandable by only an enlightened circle; "a compilation of esoteric philosophical theories")
[Esoteric vs. Exoteric...FIGHT!]

-wikipedia.org:

The word esoteric generally relates to that which is known only by a restricted number of people (contrast exoteric).

Esoteric knowledge is knowledge that is secret or not generally known.

Historically, esoteric knowledge is not generally known in large part because it is deliberately kept secret from those outside a select group. Such knowledge was confined within certain disciplines, such as magic and freemasonry. This is not the case anymore as most groups, such as the Theosophical Society and the Rosicrucian Fellowship, teach freely to anyone, often without cost.

Esoteric are an English Doom metal band founded in 1992. They incorporate extreme, somewhat distorted vocals over very slow paced riffs and eerie melodies. Combined with samples they produce nihilistic doom at its most extreme. [PN: here's their site (http://www.bereft.co.uk/).]

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1655 from Gk., esoterikos "belonging to an inner circle," from esotero, comp. adv. of eso "within." In Eng., originally of Pythagorean doctrines. According to Lucian, the division of teachings into exoteric and esoteric originated with Aristotle.

-infoplease before/after words:

-Before = esophagus
-After = esoterica


He neglects to mention that he is psychotic, though. That should be a bullet point. He could slide it in here:

"I have studied effective writing and I practiced it extensively."

...simply by citing a few examples of his work (such as his creative use of esoteric words such as "poltroon").

Bonus Quote:

We have enjoyed preparing many of your esoteric dishes. Your Monte Cristo sandwich is a current favorite among the adventurous."

-Amanpour

>edit for etymology

Talisker
06-09-2005, 06:32 AM
Andrew Myers: word of the day and a side sudo-chop in one!
I was quoting the cyclotouriste guy, in case that wasn't obvious. Just didn't put [quote] tags around it, 'cause it loses some of the funnay that way.

shift6
06-09-2005, 05:46 PM
No no, I got it dude. :)

Christien Murawski
06-10-2005, 12:19 AM
Thursday's:

agog

-dictionary.com:

Full of keen anticipation or excitement; eager.

-agog
suff.
Variant of agogue...as for synagogue or emmenagogue

-dictionary.cambridge.org:

excited; eager (to know or see more): We waited agog for news.

-Infoplease:

adj.
Highly excited by eagerness, curiosity, anticipation, etc.

adv.
In a state of eager desire; excitedly.

Word Before = ago
Word After = agogic

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

c. 1400, from O.Fr. en gogues "in jest, good humor, joyfulness," from gogue "fun," of unknown origin.

-acronymfinder.com:

Advisory Group on Governance (UK)

-links:

>people are so effing weird (http://www.agog.net/)
>I wonder if indeed every wotd is a band name (http://www.agog.de/agoge.html)

-Roget's II

[PN: Yeah, I know it's redundant, but I just love these words. I mean athirst...what a great word.]

Intensely desirous or interested: ardent, athirst, avid, bursting, eager, impatient, keen, solicitous, hungry, thirsty. Informal: raring. Idioms: ready and willing.


Agreed. I am agog and aghast that not one of you listed Star Trek V last.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-11-2005, 01:36 AM
Friday's:

nubile

-dictionary.com:

1. Ready for marriage; of marriageable age or condition. Used of young women.
2. Sexually mature and attractive. Used of young women.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1642, "marriageable" (said of woman), from Fr. nubile, from L. nubilis "marriageable," from stem of nubere "take as husband." First used in 1973 in sense of "sexually attractive."

-ARTFL Project: Webster Dictionary, 1913:

1. Of an age suitable for marriage; marriageable.
2. [of a young woman] Sexually attractive, sometimes used as a genteel euphemism for "having well-developed breasts."

-Infoplease before/after words:

>Before = Nubian goat
>After = nubilous

-wotd band:

Yes there is a band. They're called The Nubile Thangs (http://www.nubilethangs.com/).

-links:

Oh forget it.


Who wants to Slouch towards Gomorrah, when you can show up in a parade of 12 nubile fetishists.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-12-2005, 12:33 AM
Saturday's:

rigamarole

-dictionary.com:

1. Confused, rambling, or incoherent discourse; nonsense.
2. A complicated, petty set of procedures.

Variant of rigmarole.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1736, "a long, rambling discourse," from an altered, Kentish colloquial survival of ragman roll "long list or catalogue" (1523), in M.E. a long roll of verses descriptive of personal characters, used in a medieval game of chance called Rageman, perhaps from Anglo-Fr. Ragemon le bon "Ragemon the good," which was the heading on one set of the verses, referring to a character by that name. Sense transferred to "foolish activity or commotion" c. 1955, but known orally from the 1930s.

-Infoplease before/after words:

-Before = rigadoon
-After = rigatoni

-yourdictionary.com:

Something that does not have or make sense:
balderdash, blather, bunkum, claptrap, drivel, garbage, idiocy, nonsense, piffle, poppycock, rubbish, tomfoolery, trash, twaddle.
Informal tommyrot.
Slang applesauce, baloney, bilge, bull, bunk, crap, hooey, malarkey.

-links:

No band so far. But there's a game (http://www.playrigamarole.com/).


One of the service reps made me go through a giant rigamarole about trying to prove that I was the rightful owner of the laptop as I'm explaining over and over again that the thing belonged to my sister.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-13-2005, 01:46 AM
Sunday's:

mendacity

-dictionary.com:

1. The condition of being mendacious; untruthfulness.
2. A lie; a falsehood.
3. A Bush press conference.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

The tendency to be untruthful.

-MSN Encarta:

1. telling of lies: deliberate untruthfulness.
2. lie: a lie or falsehood.
3. "I did not have sexual relations with that woman."

[Personal Note: I normally don't bother with Encarta, but I loved the term "deliberate untruthfulness"...sounded like a Lifetime Original Movie title.]

-Webster's 1828:

Falsehood.
[The proper signification of this word would be a disposition to lie, or habitual lying.]

[PN: For some reason I dig knowing the words that come before and after in certain dictionaries. The word after in Webster's 1828 is mended (made better, improved). The word before (well, before 'mendacious' anyway), is mendable (capable of being mended). I'm weird, I know, but I just love that on either side of this word about falsehood is a word about making stuff better.]

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

mendacious
1616, from M. Fr. medacieux, from L. mendacium "a lie," from mendax (gen. mendacis) "lying, deceitful," related to menda "fault, defect, carelessness in writing" (cf. amend, mendicant), from PIE base *mend- "physical defect, fault." The sense evolution of mendax influenced by mentiri "to speak falsely, lie, deceive." Mendacity is attested from 1946.


It's easy to say"what's the big deal", and that "everybody knew Bush was lying", although I'm sure with a little searching we could find plenty of posts defending the administration's mendacity and lack of planning on this very site.

Bonus Quote:

We would no longer be needed. But, for the moment, there is sufficient cowardice, sloth and mendacity down there on Earth to last forever.

-Amanpour

Nellie
06-13-2005, 02:02 AM
For some reason I dig knowing the words that come before and after in certain dictionaries

Then you might get a kick out of this one: http://www.wordcount.org/

Ranks words by usage. Mendacity is the 78,294th most popular word in the english language, followed by sittingbourne and preceeded by reintegrate.

Christien Murawski
06-14-2005, 01:37 AM
Monday's:

aphorism

-dictionary.com:

1. A tersely phrased statement of a truth or opinion; an adage. See synonyms at saying.
2. A brief statement of a principle.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

1. aphorism, apothegm, apophthegm--(a short pithy instructive saying)

-Wikipedia.org:

An aphorism is a wise saying that bears repetition.

Some examples are:

*Marry in haste: Repent at leisure. --Scots proverb.
*Better to light a candle than to curse the darkness. Chinese proverb, often misattributed to Eleanor Roosevelt and Gale Snoats.
*Lost time is never found again. --Benjamin Franklin
*People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

It can embody a bit of humor or be tied to an overworked statement, such as:

*One man's meat is another man's poison.

Of course, the wisdom of an aphorism can always be brought into question, whereas the intention of wisdom is implied.

*Most respected thinker, by far.

In a number of cultures, such as Samuel Johnson's England and tribal societies throughout the world, the ability to spontaneously produce aphoristic sayings at exactly the right moment is a key determinant of social status. [PN: sound like any place you know?]

Many societies have traditional sages or culture heroes to whom aphorisms are commonly attributed, such as the Seven Sages of Greece or King Solomon.

Aphorisms is also the title of a work by Hippocrates which was well known during the mediaeval era.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1528 (especially in ref. to the "Aphorisms of Hippocrates"), from M.Fr. aphorisme, from L.L. aphorismus, from Gk. aphorismos "definition, pithy sentence," from aphorizein "to mark off, divide" apo- "from" + horizein "to bound." An aphorism is a short, pithy statement containing a truth of general import; an axiom is a statement of self-evident truth; a theorem is a demonstrable proposition in science or mathematics; an epigram is like an aphorism, but lacking in general import. Maxim and saying can be used as synonyms for aphorism.

Yahoo Serious Film Festival Quote:

Any what was with that disingenuous little aphorism about liberals listening to elite thinkers et al versus the, uh, populist preferences of conservatives -- is today one of those Reversal Days like they used to have on the ol' playground?

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-14-2005, 01:44 AM
Then you might get a kick out of this one: http://www.wordcount.org/

Thanks for this link. I love this! Great site with a really groovy interface. I could watch those words spool all day long. It may just work its way into the wotd.

Oh, and aphorism is 46489.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-15-2005, 02:14 AM
Tuesday's:

hooligans

-dictionary.com:

hooligan
1. A tough and aggressive or violent youth.
2. The people Abraham Lincoln got to end slavery.

-dictionary.cambridge.org:

A person who acts in a violent way without thinking and causes damage: Hooligans had sprayed paint all over the car.

-wordsmyth.net:

A rough, reckless, troublemaking person; hoodlum; ruffian.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

1. bully, tough, hooligan, ruffian, roughneck, rowdy, yob, yobo, yobbo -- (a cruel and brutal fellow)

-macquariedictionary.com:

1. a man who behaves in a loud, obnoxious, and often aggressive or violent way; a lout. 2. a hoodlum; young street rough.

-Roget's II:

Informal. A person who treats others violently and roughly, especially for hire: hoodlum, ruffian, hood, tough. Slang: goon, gorilla, hood.

-wikipedia.org:

Hooliganism is unruly and destructive behavior, usually by gangs of young people. The origin of the name is uncertain, but it is known that it appeared in an 1898 London police report. One theory has the name coming from an Irish hoodlum from London named Patrick Hooligan; another has it coming from a street gang in Islington named "Hooley", a third lists "Hooley" as an Irish word which means a wild, spirited party.

It is now frequently linked in the public mind with the game and support of football (soccer) clubs. The term however has been widely used since (at least) the 1980s to describe various street gangs of youths behaving indecently. Hooligans have also attached themselves to other sports, such as rugby and even cricket.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1890s, of unknown origin, first found in British newspaper police-court reports in the summer of 1898, almost certainly from the surname Houlihan, supposedly from a lively family of that name in London (who figured in music hall songs of the decade). Internationalized 20c. in communist rhetoric as Rus. khuligan, opprobrium for "scofflaws, political dissenters, etc."

-Infoplease before/after words:

>Before = hooky
>After = hooly (http://www.infoplease.com/ipd/A0479284.html)

-links:

>World Wide Words (http://www.worldwidewords.org/topicalwords/tw-hoo1.htm) : entry just has more on etymology.
> www.hooligan.com : soccer betting site. "Football is more serious than a matter of life & death." [Ohh-kay. Apparently more serious than than a matter of syntax, as well.]
> www.hooligan.org : a sportfishing site, of course.
> www.hooligans.org: "you call yourself a hooligan? HA!" [Man, I don't even know.]
>Oh, and no band that I could find. But it will be a movie (http://www.worldwidewords.org/topicalwords/tw-hoo1.htm): "A wrongfully expelled Harvard undergrad moves to London, where he is introduced to the violent underworld of soccer hooliganism."

-Wordcount ranking: 19343


Before people start coming out with "U SUPORT SLAVRY!!! OMG!1!!!", I do not. I just really hate it when people glorify Lincoln and his gang of drunken hooligans and completely defame everyone in the south at the same time.

-Amanpour

Nellie
06-15-2005, 02:21 AM
soccer betting site. "Football is more serious than a matter of life & death." [Ohh-kay. Apparently more serious than than a matter of syntax, as well.]
Or getting the quote right to begin with by the looks of it.



Some people believe football is a matter of life and death.
I'm very disappointed with that attitude.
I can assure you it is much, much more important than that.

Christien Murawski
06-16-2005, 02:25 AM
Wednesday's:

seminal

-dictionary.com:

1. Of, relating to, containing, or conveying semen or seed.
2. Of, relating to, or having the party to originate; create.
3. Highly influential in an original way, constituting or providing a basis for further development: a seminal idea in the creation of a new theory.

-wikipedia.org:

A seminal work [semen = seed (from the Latin seminalis)] is a work from which other works come--it is an engendering work which is so important in its ideas or technique that other people take these up and create new works too.

For example, Darwin's 1859 Origin of Species is a seminal work. Applications of evolutionary theory in art, literature, anthropology, and many other fields began to mulitply after 1859 and continue to do so today. So this book is seminal.

A seminal work is related to, but should not be confused with a Magnum Opus, which can also refer to the greatest work of a single individual (whether seminal or not). Origin of Species is considered Darwin's Magnum Opus and happens to be a seminal work too. Picasso's Demoisselles d'Avignon may be described truly as a seminal work--for it is considered the beginning point of Cubism. But Picasso's Guernica is considered by many his magnum opus -- his largest or greatest work.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1398, "of seed or semen," from O.Fr. seminal (14c.), from L. seminalis, from semen (gen. seminis) "seed" (see semen). Fig. sense of "full of possibilities" is attested from 1639.

-Wordcount ranking: 19361


The Swiftboat affair will go down as one of the seminal political moments of our history. Its hard to tackle an opponent whom risked his life and was wounded in an unpopular war, a veteran of which now is vindicated and carries credentials, with an incumbent whom clearly hid from danger using his family connections, and win.

-Amanpour

shift6
06-16-2005, 05:42 PM
seminal

1. Of, relating to, containing, or conveying semen or seed.
2. Of, relating to, or having the party to originate; create.
3. Highly influential in an original way, constituting or providing a basis for further development: a seminal idea in the creation of a new theory.


The Swiftboat affair will go down as one of the seminal political moments of our history. Its hard to tackle an opponent whom risked his life and was wounded in an unpopular war, a veteran of which now is vindicated and carries credentials, with an incumbent whom clearly hid from danger using his family connections, and win.
I'd like clarification on TheSelfishGene's usage. Did he mean that the Swiftboat affair was highly influential in an original way, or that it was basically a bucket of jizz?

Christien Murawski
06-17-2005, 02:57 AM
Thursday's:

grunge

-dictionary.com:

1. Filth; dirt.
2. A style of rock music that incorporates elements of punk rock and heavy metal, popularized in the early 1990's and often marked by lyrics exhibiting nihilism, dissatisfaction, or apathy.
3. A mulatto. An albino. A mosquito. My libido. Yea.

-Webster's New Millenium Dictionary of English:

A style of rock music featuring harsh guitar chords, heavy riffs and drumming, and whose performers wear sloppy clothes; also called grunge rock, grunge metal.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

1. dirt, filth, grime, soil, stain, grease, grunge -- (the state of being covered with unclean things)

-The Free Online Dictionary of Computing:

1. That which is grungy, or that which makes it so.
2. [Cambridge] Code which is inaccessible due to changes in other parts of the program. The preferred term in North America is dead code.

-Wikipedia.org:

[Personal Note: There's lotsa stuff on Wikipedia about grunge music (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grunge) that I'm not going to bother to type here.

Instead we shall talk about Grungetta Grunge.]

Grungetta Grunge is a grouch Muppet character on the children's television series Sesame Street. She primarily acts as a semi-serious romantic interest for Oscar the Grouch. She is played by Pam Arceiro.

She was retired from the show in 1999, when puppeteer Arceiro left to join the cast of Avenue Q. Grungetta made a background appearance in a 2004 episode.

She rejoined the cast in season 36 (2005), as a candidate in "The Grouch Apprentice" skit.

-Compact Oxford English Dictionary (askoxford.com):

[PN: Forgive me for all the redundancy here, but I just love the little nuances.]

1. grime; dirt. 2. a style of rock music characterized by raucous guitar sound and lazy vocal delivery. 3. A casual style of fashion including loose, layered clothing and ripped jeans.

-The Tesla Society:

1. Radio interference of either man-made or natural origin.

-Wordcount ranking: 35904

-The Shadowslang Glossary (http://www.intercom.net/user/logan1/glossary.htm#g):

A derogatory term for an Orc.


There's still plenty of good music out there, it's just not as easy to find, and you have to conform to the flavor of the now in order to stay in the high profile spots. This really isn't anything new. Anyone remember grunge? Or hair metal? Or corporate rock? Or...

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-18-2005, 01:50 AM
Friday's:

perorate

-dictionary.com:

1. To conclude a speech with a formal recapitulation
2. To speak at great length, often in a grandiloquent manner; declaim

-www.wordsmyth.net:

1. To make a long speech or speak bombastically
2. To end the speech with a formal recapitulation of the arguments.

-Encarta.msn.com:

1. end speech: to finish a speech by summarizing its main points.
2. give speech: to speak at length, especially in a formal way.

-www.allwords.com:

1. The concluding section of a speech, in which the points made are summed up.
Thesaurus: summary, conclusion, recapitulation, reiteration, closing remarks.

2. colloq: A long formal speech.

-Roget's II:

To speak in a loud, pompous, or prolonged manner: declaim, harangue, mouth, rant, rave.

-Infoplease before/after words:

Before = peroral
After = peroration

-Wordcount ranking: "Perorate is currently not in the archive."

-link: Wow. http://www.perorate.org/


Theoretically the flag regulations apply to any US flag, paper or plastic, large or small. Practically speaking, they don't apply at all, except when members of government decide to get up on their hind legs and perorate on the subject.

-Amanpour

Bull
06-18-2005, 10:18 AM
Most Q23 WotD come from P&R, which probalby says something unkind agout XtienMurawski's Q23 reading habits.

Nick Walter
06-18-2005, 10:57 AM
Most Q23 WotD come from P&R, which probalby says something unkind agout XtienMurawski's Q23 reading habits.

Or possibly just implies that P&R attracts the posters with the worst monocle envy.

Christien Murawski
06-19-2005, 01:12 AM
Saturday's:

infamy

-dictionary.com:

1. Evil fame or reputation.
2. The condition of being infamous.
3. An evil or criminal act that is publicly known.
4. An act that disturbs my viewing of a movie in a theatre.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

1. infamy, opprobrium -- (a state of extreme dishonor, "a date which will live in infamy"-F.D.Roosevelt; "the name was a by-word of scorn and opprobrium throughout the city.")
2. infamy -- (evil fame or public reputation)

-Infoplease.com:

1. extremely bad reputation, public reproach, or strong condemnation as the result of a shameful, criminal, or outrageous act: a time that will live in infamy.
2. infamous character or conduct.
3. an infamous act or circumstance.
4. Law. loss of rights, incurred by conviction of an infamous offense.

Word before = infamous
Word after = infancy

-Webster's 1828:

1. Total loss of reputation; public disgrace. Avoid the crimes and vices which expose men to infamy.
2. Qualities which are detested and despised; qualities notoriously bad and scandalous; as the infamy of an action.
3. In law, that loss of character or public disgrace which a convict incurs, and by which a person is rendered incapable of being a witness or juror.

-Favorite Film Reference:

The definition of infamous that helps the boys decide to go down to Mexico in ¡Three Amigos!.

-Links:

>The Catholic Encyclopedia (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08001a.htm) has some good stuff.
>Infamous June 2005 (http://www.thestumponline.com/infamous.htm)

-Wordcount ranking: 63475


But "Mm-hm, tha's mah elf!" lives in a special kind of infamy.

-Amanpour

600

Christien Murawski
06-20-2005, 12:52 AM
Sunday's:

trenchant

-dictionary.com:

1. Forceful, effective, and vigorous: a trenchant argument. See synonyms at incisive.
2. Caustic; cutting: trenchant criticism.
3. Distinct; clear-cut.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

1. searching, trenchant -- (having keenness and forcefulness and penetration in thought, expression, or intellect; "searching insights"; "trenchant criticism")
2. hard-hitting, trenchant -- (characterized by or full of force and vigor; "a hard-hitting expose"; "a trenchant argument")
3. clear-cut, distinct, trenchant -- (clearly or sharply defined to the mind; "clear-cut evidence of tampering"; "Claudius was the first to invade Britain with distinct...intentions of conquest"; "trenchant distinctions between right and wrong")

-Roget's II:

1. Possessing or displaying perceptions of great accuracy and sensitivity: acute, incisive, keen, penetrating, perceptive, probing, sensitive, sharp. 2. So sharp as to cause mental pain: acerbic, acid, acidic, acrid, astringent, biting, caustic, corrosive, cutting, mordacious, mordant, pungent, scathing, sharp, slashing, stinging, truculent, vitriolic. See attack, respect.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

c. 1330, "cutting, sharp," from O.Fr. trenchant "cutting, sharp," prp. of trenchier "to cut" (see trench). Figurative sense is recorded from 1603.

-Wordcount ranking: 37772


Seriously. You're a trenchant self-parody of a libertarian conservative. Even freepers have more style.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-21-2005, 02:40 AM
Monday's:

shenanigans:

-dictionary.com:

1. a. A deceitful trick; an underhanded act.
b. Remarks intended to deceive; deceit. Often used in the plural.
2. a. A playful or mischievous act; a prank.
b. Mischief; prankishness. Often used in the plural.
3. There's an old saying in Tennessee--I know it's in Texas, probably in Tennessee--that says, 'Fool me once, shame on...shame on you. It fooled me...we can't get fooled again.'

-Wikipedia.org:

A deceitful confidence trick, also mischief causing discomfort or annoyance. Often used in the plural: shenanigans. The word may have come from the Irish language. Popularized in the South Park episode "Cow Days". In episode one of Twin Peaks, Catherine Martell accuses Josie Packard of shenanigans, Josie asks Agent Cooper and Sheriff Truman to define the term, which Cooper does. It was also referenced in the movie Super Troopers. Sometimes abbreviated "shens", as in "I claim SHENS!" By convention, shenanigans may not be called between St. Patrick's Day and Arbor Day.

[Personal Note: I have no idea what any of the stuff after the word "Troopers" means.]

Shenanigan Kids, a 1920 animated series by Bray Productions.

Shenanigans, a singles collection and movie hits by Green Day. Generally it is considered as a collection for fans to endure the 4-year gap of Warning and American Idiot.

Shenanigan (UK band), an Irish folk music band based in Worthing, Sussex, England.

Shenanigan (CA band), a six-piece celtic band from Vancouver, Canada.

-Roget's II:

[PN: There's a huge list of words in this entry, I'll just include a few I found particularly enjoyable.]

devilry, diablerie, high jinks, impishness, rascality, roguery, tomfoolery, caper, frolic, lark, monkeyshine, subterfuge, wile...etc.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1855, of uncertain origin. Earliest records of it are in San Francisco and Sacramento, California. Suggestions include Sp. chanada, a shortened form of charranada "trick, deceit," or, less likely, Ger. Schenigelei, peddler's argot for "work, craft," or the related Ger. slang verb schinäglen. Another guess centers on Ir. sionnach "fox."

-Links:

>Requisite NSFW link: http://www.shenanigans.net/ (also labelled as TTFB...which means Too Tame For Bill)
>Web Designer of the Year Award goes to this one (http://shenanigans.tv/)
>Best Use of a Domain Name goes to this one (http://www.shenanigans.com/).

-Wordcount ranking: 46719


I'm remarkably cynical, and even I was surprised by some of the shenanigans that go on.

Bonus Quote

I swear to God I'm going to pistol whip the next guy who says, 'Shenanigans.'

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-22-2005, 01:49 AM
Monday's:

goy

-dictionary.com:

n. Offensive pl. goyim or goys

1. Used as a disparaging term for one who is not a Jew.
2. One too white to know the word 'goy'. As if the Jews hadn't suffered enough at the hands of the Poles already.
3. Oskar Schindler.

-wordnet.princeton.edu:

1. Gentile, non-Jew, goy -- (in this sense 'Gentile' denotes a Christian as contrasted with a Jew, 'goy' is a derogatory word for Christians used by Jews)

-Wikipedia.org:

Goy is a Hebrew word which means "nation" or "people". It is generally (though not exclusively) used to refer to non-Jews.

The first use of Goy (plural Goyim) in the Hebrew Bible is in Genesis 10:1, in reference to non-Israelite nations. Its first use in reference to Israelites is in Genesis 12:2, where Abraham is promised that his descendants will form a goy gadol or great nation. The word (in its various forms) is used over 550 times in the Hebrew Bible; in the earlier books it more often refers to the Israelites, but in the later books it more often refers to non-Israelite nations. As a result, in Hebrew and Yiddish goy has come to refer to a member of the Gentile (i.e. non-Jewish) nations.

While its use in Hebrew and Yiddish is neutral, its use in English is usually considered derogatory, and many Hebrew and Yiddish speakers have come to see it that way in those tongues as well. As a result, it has somewhat fallen out of favor, and in recent decades written works in Hebrew and Yiddish have begun using circumlocutions which generally translate as "non-Jew" and "gentile" instead.

-Infoplease before/after words:

>Before = gox
>After = Goya

-Acronym Finder: GOY = Get Over Yourself

-Favorite Goy Film Moment:
When Woody Allen's character in Hannah and Her Sisters tries to convert to Catholicism and brings home a bag of goyish stuff, including a jar of mayonnaise.

-Weirdest Goy Reading Moment: When I read that scene in Portnoy's Complaint where Portnoy has...um...relations with the liver destined for the family's dinner table.

-Favorite Thing About Searching for the Word Goy: When you type it into Google, Google says, "Did you mean: gay?"


Cut him a break, Nahr. Amanpour's just too white to know the word 'goy'.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-23-2005, 01:45 AM
Wednesday's:

Godwin's Law

-Wikipedia.org:

Godwin's Law (also Godwin's rule of Nazi analogies) in an adage in Internet culture that was originated by Mike Godwin in 1990. The law states that:

As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches one.

There is a tradition among many Usenet newsgroups that once such a comparison is made, the thread is over, and whoever mentioned the Nazis has automatically lost whatever argument was in progress. In addition, it is considered poor form to invoke the law explicitly. Godwin's law thus practically guarantees the existence of an upper bound on thread length in those groups. Many people understand Godwin's Law to mean this, although (as is clear from the statement of the law above) this is not the original formation.

Nevertheless, there is a widely recognized codicil that any intentional invocation of Godwin's law for its thread-ending effects will be unsuccessful. See "Quirk's Exception" [ahem] below.

ORIGIN

Godwin's law is named for Mike Godwin, who was legal counsel for the Electronic Frontier Foundation in the early 1990s, when the law was first popularized.

NOTES

When discussing with actual neo-Nazis, Godwin's law should not typically apply, as Hitler is bound to come up on one or the other side of the argument sooner rather than later. It is also interesting that, among Nazis, a "reverse Godwin's law" exists where, as an argument devolves into a flame war, there is an increasingly greater probability that one or the other side will invoke a comparison to Jews as an insult, much the same as a comparison to Hitler or Nazis is regularly an insulting one.

CORROLARIES

>Case's corollary: If the subject is Heinlein or homosexuality, the probability of a Hitler/Nazi comparison being made becomes equal to one.

>Sircar's corollary:If the Usenet discussion touches on homosexuality or Heinlein, Nazis or Hitler are mentioned within three days.

>Quirk's exception: Intentional invocation of this so-called "Nazi Clause" is ineffectual.

[Personal Note: "Nazi Clause"...so they celebrated Christmas then.]

-Links:

>original Godwin's law post (http://groups-beta.google.com/group/news.groups/msg/b54314f075182eeb)
>Mike Godwin's Godwin's law blog (http://www.godwinslaw.org/)
>I include this (http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/2.10/godwin.if_pr.html) because it's about memes.
>A FAQ (http://www.faqs.org/faqs/usenet/legends/godwin/) about it.

-No Wordcount mention of Godwin's Law but nazi is 8214 (right before "beloved") and Hitler is 4775.


Now we get the standard attempt to demonize those people who are against smoking by comparing them to various groups. I'm surprised that you didn't include Nazis, or are you afraid of invoking Godwin's law?

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-24-2005, 02:01 AM
Thursday's:

nonces

-dictionary.com:

nonce: The present or particular occasion: "Her tendency to discover a touch of sadness had for the nonce disappeared." (Theodore Dreiser)

-Wikipedia.org:

Nonce means "for the present time" or "for a single occasion or purpose", although the word is not often found in general use. A dictionary may note nonce words, those for which there is only a single textual instance.

In security engineering, a nonce is a 'number used once'. It is often a random or pseudo-random number used in an authentication protocal to ensure that old communications cannot be reused to 'replay attacks'.

Nonces are used in HTTP digest access authentication to calculate an MD5 digest of the password. The nonces are different each time the 401 authentication challenge response code is presented, thus making the replay attack virtually impossible.

In the UK, the term nonce is a slang word used to refer to a sex offenders [sic], especially paedophiles, and thus as an insult. Folk etymologies for the origins of this word state that the word derives from Not of Normal Criminal Ethos, used to mean an offender whose motivation was different from the purely acquisitive, or possibly Not on Normal Courtyard Exercise, for prisoners that were not to be mixed with the general population for their own safety. As with most cases, these folk etymologies are examples of backronyms and should not be taken seriously. The actual origin of this word is unknown, but it is probably that it is derived from nancy, a derogatory term referring to homosexual males.

-Dictionary of slang ( http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/n.htm ):

Noun 1. A sexual deviant, having been convicted of a sex crime against children.
2. An objectionable or contemptible person, by extension of the definition in noun 1.

-Infoplease before/after words:

>Before: non causa pro causa
>After: noncellular

-Wordcount ranking: 76645 [PN: color me surprised]


Theres nothing worse than seeing someone gush spoilers about the finale of an interesting show or movie that won't reach your country for months, if not a year. Especially in these days of RSS feeds and nonces posting inconsiderately to their blogs.

-Amanpour

Nellie
06-24-2005, 04:19 AM
-Wordcount ranking: 76645 [PN: color me surprised]

I believe that Wordcount's source is primarily English English rather than American English at the current time (if that makes any sense). So you might find common US terms/slang that haven't made it into UK parlance a bit lacking.

shift6
06-24-2005, 05:54 PM
A dictionary may note nonce words, those for which there is only a single textual instance.
Believe it or not, I'd never heard this usage of "nonce", but instead used the similar "hapax legomenon". Isn't it crazy how there are often very simple words to convey meanings that we only learn in complex form?

Christien Murawski
06-25-2005, 09:46 AM
Friday's:

lothario

-dictionary.com:

A man who seduces women.

-Wordnet 2.0:

1. Lothario --(a successful womanizer (after a fictional seducer))

Synonyms/Hypernyms:

womanizer, womaniser, philanderer -- (a man who likes many women and has short sexual relationships with them )

[i]Coordinate Terms (sisters) of noun lothario:

>Casanova -- (any man noted for his amorous adventures)
>Don Juan -- (any successful womanizer (after the profligate Spanish nobleman))
>wolf, woman chaser, skirt chaser, masher -- (a man who is aggressive in making amorous advances to women)

-Wikipedia.org:

Lothario was a character in Nicholas Rowe's 1703 play The Fair Penitent, who seduces and betrays the female lead. The name has come to mean any lecherous individual, especially male.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

"lady-killer," 1756, from the principal male character of Nicholas Rowe's The Fair Penitent (1703). The name is the It. form of O.H.G. Hlothari, Hludher (whence Ger. Luther), lit. "famous warrior," from O.H.G. lut (see loud) + heri "host, army."

-OneLook.com:

A gay seducer of women; a libertine.

-Word-detective.com:

Lothario is an "eponym," a word formed from the proper name of a famous real or fictional person.

-Wordcount ranking: 61911


So much good stuff with Kirk. Giving him glasses, forcing him to deal with his age. Giving the lothario of space a son. The whole "You can't always escape" sub-plot was brilliant, making an often two-dimensional character much richer and deeper. Suddenly his actions had consequences.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-26-2005, 02:37 AM
Saturday's:

parse

-dictionary.com:
v. tr.

1. To break (a sentence) down into its component parts of speech with an explanation of the form, function, and syntactical relationship of each part.
2. To describe (a word) by stating its part of speech, form, and syntactical relationships in a sentence.
3. a. To examine closely or subject to detailed analysis, especially by breaking up into components. "What are we missing by parsing the behavior of chimpanzees into the conventional categories recognized largely from our own behavior?" (Stephen Jay Gould)
b. To make sense of; comprehend: I simply couldn't parse what you just said.
4. Computer Science. To analyze or separate (input, for example) into more easily processed components.
5. It depends what your definition of "is" is.

v. intr.

To admit of being parsed: sentences that do not parse easily.

-Infoplease before/after words:

>Before = pars
>After = parsec

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

c. 1553,"to state the parts of speech in a sentence," verb use of M.E. pars (n.) "part of speech" (c. 1300), from O.Fr. pars, pl. of part "part," from L. pars (see part(n.)) in school question, Quae pars orationis? "What part of speech?"

-Acronym Finder:

>Parameterization by Solvation Energy
>Program for the Assessment and Repair of Shipboard Elevators (US Navy)

-Wordcount ranking: 31775


I didn't mean to explain anything. I was just pointing out that I didn't think your rewrite was as funny as the orginal, that it didn't really make it more sensible, and that the verb didn't parse.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-27-2005, 01:56 AM
Sunday's:

wannabes

n. pl. of wannabe also wannabee

1. One who aspires to a role or position.
2. One who imitates the behavior, customs, or dress of an admired person or group.
3. A product designed to imitate the qualities or characteristics of something.

adj.
Wishing or aspiring to be; would-be.

-Wikipedia.org:

A wannabe (sometimes spelled wannabee) is a person who wishes to be (or to imitate) something, a "would-be". The term was used to describe Madonna fans who dress, talk, and act like their idol. It probably originated from biker slang. See also the Wannabe song (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wannabe_%28song%29) ("With its catchy choruses, the song is also famous for placing "zig-a-zig-ah" into the lexicon."). Often the term is associated with excessive zeal.

>Hackerdom Usage
The connotations of this term differ sharply depending on the age and exposure of the subject. Used of a person who is in or might be entering larval stage, it is semi-approving; such wannabees can be annoying but most hackers remember that they, too, were once such creatures. When used of any professional programmer, computer science academic, writer, or suit, it is derogatory, implying that said person is trying to cuddle up to the hacker mystique but doesn't, fundamentally, have a prayer of understanding what it is all about. Overuse of terms from the Hacker's Lexicon is often an indication of the wannabee nature. Compare newbie.

Additional Usage
The term wannabe has also been used to describe individuals of European descent who desire to participate in the spiritual practices of indigenous peoples, especially Native Americans. The term in this context is most commonly used in the pejorative manner.

-Cambridge dictionary:

a person who is trying to achieve success or fame, usually unsuccessfully: The bar is frequented by wannabe actresses and film directors.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1981, originally Amer.Eng. surfer slang, from casual pronunciation of want to be; popularized c.1984 in reference to female fans of pop singer Madonna.

-Links:

> http://www.wannabe.uk.com/ : "This site is the end product of trying to explain to people what it was that I went and did every other weekend, where all my money goes, and why I own enough tactical gear to successfully invade Belgium"
>Wannabes Beware! (http://www.nightscribe.com/Military/SEALs/wannabe_seals.htm) : "The Wannabes better beware of the SEALS they imitate!!!!! Look Out!! The Real SEALS are finding them out!!!"
> http://www.wannabegirl.org/ : "My name is Firda and I am an Indonesian walking disaster..."
>Norma...Xena wannabe (http://members.aol.com/normawp/)...[PN: oh god kill me now.]

-Wordcount ranking: 77522


There's only two things I hate in this world: people who are intolerant of other people's cultures and Greek Dream Theater wannabes.:wink:

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-28-2005, 02:13 AM
Monday's:

palliatives

-dictionary.com:

adj.
1. Tending or serving to palliate. [Personal Note: I just love it when a word is used to define itself. Would it be so hard just to define the damn word within the definition? Assmonkeys.]
2. Relieving or soothing the symptoms of a disease or disorder without affecting a cure.

>sub definition: palliate

tr.v.
1. To make (an offense or crime) seem less serious; extenuate.
2. To make less severe or intense; mitigate: tried unsuccessfully to palliate the widespread discontent.
3. To relieve the symptoms of a disease or disorder.

n.
One that palliates, especially a palliative drug or medicine.

-Wikipedia.org:

Palliative care is any form of medical care or treatment that concentrates on reducing the severity of the symptoms of a disease or slows its progress without providing a cure. It aims at improving quality of life, and particularly at reducing or eliminating pain.

-Webster's 1828:

adj. Extenuating, serving to extenuate by excuses or other favorable representation.

n. That which extenuates. That which mitigates, alleviates or abates the violence of pain, disease or other evil.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

"to alleviate without curing," 1543 (implied in palliative), from M.L. palliatus, lit. "cloaked," from pp. of L.L. palliare "cover with a cloak, conceal," from L. pallium "cloak"(see pall(n.)).

-Wordcount ranking: 34692


Some people are crazy needy and will believe any piece of BS that they think gives them the inside scoop on the mysteries of the universe--especially one that departs from the "normal" palliatives (major religions, etc.) that have already failed them.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
06-29-2005, 02:41 AM
Tuesday's:

dystopian

-dictionary.com:

adj.
1. Of or relating to a dystopia.
2. Dire; grim: "AIDS is one of the dystopian harbingers of the global village." (Susan Sontag)

>sub definition: dystopia

n.
1. An imaginary place or state in which the condition of life is extremely bad, as from deprivation, oppression, or terror.
2. A work describing such a place or state: "dystopias such as Brave New World" (Times Literary Supplement)

-Wikipedia.org:

A dystopia (alternatively, cacotopia, kakotopia, or anti-utopia) is the antithesis of a utopian society. Dystopian societies are usually characterized by extreme governmental tyranny and an exploitation of the people.

In most dystopian works of fiction, a corrupt government creates or sustains the poor quality of life, often conditioning the masses to believe the society is proper and just, even decent. Most dystopian fiction takes place in the future, but often purposely incorporates contemporary social trends taken to their unrestrained logical conclusion. Many works of fiction will often portray these hypothetical dystopian societies as existing in a future time when the conditions of life are extremely bad due to deprivation, oppression, or terror.

-Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary:

An imaginary place where people lead dehumanized and often fearful lives.

-Infoplease.com:

a society characterized by human misery, as squalor, oppression, disease, and overcrowding.

>Word Before = dystonia
>Word After = dystrophic

-Stedman's Online Medical Dictionary:

Faulty or abnormal position of a body part or organ. Syn: allotopia, malposition.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

dystopia
"imaginary bad place," 1868, in writings of J.S. Mill, from Gk. dys- "bad, abnormal, difficult" (see dys-) + (u)topia (q.v.).

-Links:

> http://www.dystopian.org/ : [Personal Note: I don't even know.]
> http://www.dystopia.org/ : [PN: I understand this even less. Though I appreciate the title that appears on my Firefox tab for this site: "All you [sic] base are belong to us".]
>This is fun. This link supposedly goes to The Daily Dystopian (http://www.blogstudio.com/dystopia/), which may or may not be a blog. Who knows. You read the archives and let me know. What I do know is that this page has a Dan Quayle quote, and the last entry, May 12, 2004, proclaims..."Dystopia has moved." Not just the blog apparently, but the concept. For you follow the link to the new location (http://www.blog-city.com/bc/blognotfound.cfm?bloggname=dystopia.blog-city.com) and you get the message, "This blog does not exist." I love little bits like this.

-Wordcount Ranking: neither dystopian nor dystopia are in the archive. I'm surprised, as I would have thought the English English would be fond of the word.

-Favorite Dystopian Film:
Blade Runner

-Favorite Dystopian Film Performance:
Bruce Willis in Twelve Monkeys

-Favorite Dystopian Film Vehicle:
That weird tank/RV thing they drive that's now sitting in that fenced in parking lot on Cahuenga Blvd. from Damnation Alley.

-Favorite Dystopian Killing Choreography:
The Gunkata (http://www.gunkatta.com/home.htm) from Equilibrium

-Favorite Dystopian Song:
"Synchronicity II" by The Police

-Favorite Dystopian Novel:
Alas Babylon by Pat Frank. [Maybe this is just post-apocalyptic though.] {Runner Up: The Stand by Stephen "Mr. Epigraph" King}

-Favorite Dystopian Game:
Yeah...somebody else is gonna have to answer this one. I'm in over my head.


Dystopian world. This is mostly for Ultimate X-Men, which is a supremely cynical and depressing vision of the modern world. Wasn't this new Ultimate series spurred by the movies (I read that somewhere)? I don't remember the movies being set in an alternate universe where the world just flat out sucks.

Bonus Quote:

Like...tears...in...rain.

-Amanpour

Tom Chick
06-29-2005, 03:00 AM
-Favorite Dystopian Game:
Yeah...somebody else is gonna have to answer this one. I'm in over my head.

I can take care of this one for you: your Favorite Dystopian Game is Fallout 2. Like, duh.

-Tom

Tom Chick
06-29-2005, 03:04 AM
And BTW, I do think you're confusing dystopian with post-Apocalyptic. You're going to need to rework a lot of your Favorites, including your Favorite Dystopian Game.

Might I suggest Beneath a Steel Sky or maybe Peter Molyneux's Syndicate?

-Tom

Rywill
06-29-2005, 06:30 AM
Tom is only suggesting those because he refuses to suggest Deus Ex. Nothing says "dystopia" like a blown-up Statue of Liberty. Oooh--symbolism. *Shivers*

spacemonkey
06-29-2005, 02:51 PM
Tom is only suggesting those because he refuses to suggest Deus Ex. Nothing says "dystopia" like a blown-up Statue of Liberty. Oooh--symbolism. *Shivers*

...or a shitload of crates...or dimwitted enemies who forget that you exist whenever you walk into the next room...

Christien Murawski
06-30-2005, 03:11 AM
Wednesday's:

execrable

-dictionary.com:

adj.
1. Deserving of execration; hateful.
2. Extremely inferior; very bad: an execrable meal.

>sub definition: execration

n.
1. The act of cursing.
2. A curse.
3. Something that is cursed or loathed.

-Wordnet 2.0:

1. deplorable, execrable, miserable, woeful, wretched -- (of very poor quality or condition)
2. abominable, detestable, execrable, odious -- (unequivocally detestable: "abominable treatment of prisoners"; "detestable vices"; "execrable crimes"; "consequences odious to those you govern" - Edmund Burke)
3. damnable, execrable -- (deserving a curse; "her damnable pride")

-Infoplease.com:

1. uttely detestable; abominable; abhorrent.
2. very bad: an execrable stage performance.

>Word before = exec
>Word after = execrate

-Roget's II:

So annoying or detestable as to deserve condemnation: accursed, blasted, blessed, bloody, confounded, cursed, damn, darn, infernal. Informal: blamed, damned. Chiefly British: blooming, ruddy.

-Wordcount ranking: 73456 (between solutes and icus)


Or are you simply basing your impression off of crap like King Kong Versus Godzilla or Dino De Laurentii's execrable updates, King Kong (1979) and King Kong Lives (1985)? Because it's hard for me to believe that anyone could watch the original King Kong and think "blah" - it's still one of the greatest adventure movies of all time and the stop-motion animation is still extremely impressive.

Bonus Quote:

Yeah, blondes are scarce around here.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-01-2005, 04:52 AM
Thursday's:

draconian

-dictionary.com:

Exceedingly harsh; very severe: a draconian legal code; draconian budget cuts.

-Wikipedia.org:

>Draco is an Athenian law scribe, whose laws were described as "draconian."
>Draconian D&D refers to creatures unique to the Dragonlance fantasy world.
>Draconian (Doctor Who) refers to an extraterrestrial race from the Doctor Who televison series.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1876 (earlier Draconic, 1680), from Draco, Gk. statesman who laid down a code of laws for Athens 621 B.C.E. that mandated death as punishment for minor crimes. His name seems to mean lit. sharp-sighted (see dragon).

>Wordcount ranking: 25262

Before = undertakers
After = Drakonic


Most of what companies are doing now (suing their customers, draconian copy protection) actually reduce the value of their offering.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-02-2005, 02:29 AM
Friday's:

balliwick (also spelled bailiwick)

-dictionary.com:

1. A person's specific area of interest, skill, or authority. See Synonyms at field.
2. The office or district of a bailiff.

-Wikipedia.org:

A bailiwick is the area of jurisdiction of a bailiff. The term was also applied to a territory in which the sheriff's functions were exercised by a privately appointed bailiff under a Crown grant. The word is now more generally used in a metaphorical sense, to indicate a sphere of activity, experience, study, or interest.

The term originated in France (the term bailie being the Old French term for a bailiff) and was used on both sides of the English Channel, although bailiwicks (balliages in French) tended to be rather more widespread in northern France than the south. In English, the original French bailie was combined with "-wic", the Anglo-Saxon suffix meaning a village, to produce a term meaning literally "bailiff's village" - the original geographic scope of a bailiwick. In the 19th Century, it was absorbed into American English as a metaphor for one's sphere of knowledge or activity.

The term survives in administrative usage in the Channel Islands, which for administrative purposes are grouped into the two bailiwicks of Jersey (comprising the island of Jersey and the islets known as the Minquiers and Ecréhous) and Guernsey (comprising the islands of Guernsey, Sark, Alderney, Brecqhou, Herm, Jethou, and Lihou). Each Channel Island bailiwick is headed by a Bailiff.

-Wordnet 2.0:

1. bailiwick -- (the area over which a bailiff has jurisdiction)
2. discipline, subject, subject area, subject field, field of study, study, bailiwick, branch of knowledge -- (a branch of knowledge; "in what discipline is his doctorate?" ; "teachers should be well trained in their subject" ; "anthropology is the study of human beings")

-Roget's II:

A sphere of activity, experience, study, or interest: area, arena, circle, department, domain, field, orbit, province, realm, scene, subject, terrain, territory, world. Slang: bag.

-Wordcount ranking: 49743 (between entailment and chummy)


I don't know the father personally, but he has distinctive gaming tastes that are a bit out of my balliwick.

-Amanpour

[Personal Note: Genera was so close. So close. But that was really just because I wanted to post a bunch of links showing abuse of the word. And that seemed like cheating. Oh well.]

Christien Murawski
07-03-2005, 01:25 AM
Saturday's:

anathema

1. A formal, ecclesiastical ban, curse, or excommunication.
2. A vehement denunciation; a curse: "the sound of a witch's anathemas in some unknown tongue" (Nathaniel Hawthorne).
3. One that is cursed or damned.
4. One that is greatly reviled, loathed, or shunned.

-Wikipedia.org:

Anathema (term): (Greek word meaning 1. to be formally set apart, 2. banished, exiled, excommunicated or 4. denounced, often misinterpreted to mean accursed.) There is great difficulty with this word especially since it has now become commonly associated with the term accursed. The correct broader meaning of the term is applied to someone "set apart, banished and to be considered beyond the judgement and help of the community." Unfortunately, within the English language one does not find such a term. To use the term curse alone suggests dark powers and magical arts. Cursing or putting hexes on people in both the Judeo/Christian understanding is incompatible, forbidden paganistic and foreign.

In Hebrew usage, anathema is anything laid up or suspended; hence anything laid up in a temple or set apart as sacred.

Anathema (band): an English band from the city of Liverpool, which together with Paradice Lost and My Dying Bride developed the doom metal genre [PN: or genera, I guess].

Anathema was formed in the year 1990 under the name Pagan Angel. In November of that year, the band recorded their first demo, entitled An Iliad of Woes. The switching of names occured in the beginning of 1991.

-Infoplease.com:

1. a person or thing detested or loathed: That subject is anathema to him.
2. a person or thing accursed or consigned to damnation or destruction.
3. a formal ecclesiastical curse involving excommunication.
4. any imprecation of divine punishment.
5. a curse; execration.

>Word Before = anatexis
>Word After = anathematic

-Roget's II:

1. A denunciation invoking a wish or threat of evil or injury: curse, damnation, execration, imprecation, malediction. Archaic: malison. 2. An object of extreme dislike: abhorrence, abomination, aversion, bete noire, bugbear, detestation, execration, hate. Informal: horror.

-Wordcount ranking: 23783 (between dawning and greener)

-Links:

>The band's official website (http://www.anathema.ws/)
>LARP group (http://www.anathema.net/home_about_us.html) : "Anathema is a small group of horror and gaming enthusiasts based in Los Angeles who participate in Live Action Role Playing, or LARP, in the Los Angeles area.
> http://anathema.gothring.org/ : "The Anathema Ring is an elite ring consisting of feminine aesthetically pleasing sites. If you have a Glam, Gothic, Fantasy, Egyptian, Celtic, Wiccan, or Pagan themed site, please feel free to join this ring..."


Aikido is about non-violence, non-aggression, and thus competition is anathema to that. You will rarely (if ever) find sanctioned "aikido tournaments". In aikido you practice as defender (nage) or attacker (uke), and at higher levels you practice randori, which is sort of like sparring but you're basically defending yourself.

-Amanpour

Troy S Goodfellow
07-03-2005, 02:58 PM
Friday's:

balliwick (also spelled bailiwick)

Why go with "also spelled"? Isn't this just a terrible misspelling on my part? Or is my mangling an officially accepted word?

Troy

Christien Murawski
07-04-2005, 12:38 AM
In the history of Q23 you've spelled it that way for years. Okay...really only twice. I just figured you knew something I didn't know.

Plus I was trying to be nice. This thread isn't generally intended to be a forum for highlighting people's mistakes. Rather it's an opportunity to celebrate words and how we here, in particular, use them. So when a wotd is misspelled, I just pretend the writer used an alternate spelling. But they know. Oh yes, they know.

Thanks for coming clean, Troy. Or as I've come to think of you...Mr. Long Hard Slog.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-04-2005, 01:36 AM
Sunday's:

prurient

-dictionary.com:

1. Inordinately interested in matters of sex; lascivious.
2. a. Characterized by an inordinate interest in sex: prurient thoughts.
b. Arousing or appealing to an inordinate interest in sex: prurient literature.

-Wordnet 2.0:

1. lubricious, lustful, prurient, salacious -- (characterized by lust; "eluding the lubricious embraces of her employer"; "her sensuous grace roused his lustful nature"; "prurient literature"; "prurient thoughts"; "a salacious rooster of a little man").

[Personal Note: lubricious is just a great word]

-Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary:

Marked by or arousing an immoderate or unwholesome interest or desire; especially: marked by arousing, or appealing to unusual sexual desire.

-Cambridge Dictionaries Online:

Too interested in the details of another person's sexual behavior.

-Infoplease.com:

1. having, inclined to have, or characterized by lascivious or lustful thoughts, desires, etc.
2. causing lasciviousness or lust
3. having a restless desire or longing.

>Word before = prunt
>Word after = pruriginous

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1639, "itching," later "having an itching desire" (1653), esp. "lascivious, lewd," (1746), from L. prurientem (nom. pruriens), prp. of prurire "to itch, long for, be wanton," perhaps related to pruna "glowing coals."

[PN: remind me to tell you about the word "wanton" as it relates to an actress friend's resume sometime...]

-Roget's II:

Feeling or devoted to sexual love or desire: amative, amorous, concupiscent, erotic, lascivious, lewd, labidinous, lustful, lusty, passionate, sexy.

[PN: concupiscent is another great one]

[PN: I started looking up links then realized it would just be a ridiculous exercise in NSFW stuff, even if most of it was TTFB. So...go get your own links. And if you find a band called Prurient, be sure to let me know.]

-Wordcount ranking: 51617 (between midbrain and steerage)

[PN: I realize this observation is meaningless, but this little unfolding is one reason I've come to love Wordcount.org. I just love that prurient is between the midbrain and steerage. So, thanks again Nellie.]

Okay, enough of this nonsense...


EDIT: Removed prurient cynicism. It's so out of place here.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-05-2005, 02:27 AM
Monday's:

blandish

-dictionary.com:

To coax by flattery or wheedling; cajole.

-Roget's II:

1. to persuade or try to persuade by gentle persistent urging or flattery: cajole, coax, honey, wheedle. Informal: soft-soap, sweet talk.
2. to compliment excessively and ingratiatingly: adulate, butter up, flatter, honey, slaver.

-Wordnet 2.0:

1. flatter, blandish -- (praise somewhat dishonestly)

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

c. 1305, from O.Fr. blandiss- stem of blandir "to flatter," from L. blandiri "flatter," from blandus "mild, smooth" (see bland).


If a game is particularly awful but has a lot of marketing muscle or a powerful publisher behind, it's just a good policy to not publically blandish the game before your review hits shelves, since it could be perceived as "unfair bias" by the game publisher.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-06-2005, 03:29 AM
Tuesday's:

Ockham's Razor

-dictionary.com:

A rule in science and philosophy stating that entities should not be multiplied needlessly. The rule is interpreted to mean that the simplest of two or more competing theories is preferable and that an explanation for unknown phenomena should first be attempted in terms of what is already known. Also called law of parsimony.

-Wikipedia.org:

Occam's Razor (pronounced OCK-um, also spelled Ockham's Razor or any of several other spellings), is a principle attributed to the 14th century English logician and Franciscan friar, William of Ockham that forms the basis of methodological reductionism, also called the principle of parsimony or law of economy.

In its simplest form, Ockham's Razor states that one should make no more assumptions than needed. Put into everyday language it says, The simplest explanation is the best. When multiple explanations are available for a phenomenon, the simplest version is preferred. For example, a charred tree on the ground could be caused by a landing alien ship or a lightning strike. According to Ockham's Razor, the lightning strike is the preferred explanation as it requires the fewest assumptions.

Ockham wrote, in Latin, Pluralitas non est ponenda sine necessitate, which translates literally into English as, "Plurality should not be posited without necessity."

Walter of Chatton was a contemporary of William of Ockham (1287-1347) who took exception to Ockham's Razor and Ockham's use of it. In response he devised his own anti-razor. "If three things are not enough to verify an affirmative proposition about things, a fourth must be added, and so on." ...Chatton's anti-razor has not known anything like the success of Ockham's Razor.

-Links:

>Yes, there's a band (http://www.ockhams-razor-band.com/). Either that or this is a picture of a community theatre troupe's stage version of The Usual Suspects.
>Ockham's Razor as it relates to spelling (http://home.vicnet.net.au/~ozideas/spockham.htm). I include this as spelling is something of an issue in some other threads.
>Improv group (http://occam.uchicago.edu/) from Chicago.
>Oh good, here's another band (http://www.fortunecity.com/bally/joyce/203/). This one looks like a group Stephen King got together so his band with Dave Barry wouldn't be the Dorkiest Looking Band Evar.
>Okay, there's no dearth of Ockham's Razor bands. I'm not linking to all of them. Hopefully somebody will start a thread that lists How They Rank The Ockham's Razor Bands. Hopefully we'll also get a separate thread for the other spelling.
>I lied. one more (http://www.activerecs.com/homeA.htm). I include it because they are clearly above the fray when it comes to crappy website design. Always a plus.

-Wordcount ranking: Wordcount lists only the word occam and it falls between pestered and banquets.


Ockham's Razor, dude. What's simpler: (1) terrorists hijack and fly an airliner into the towers, a combination of impact and heat weakened and collapsed WTC 1 and 2, with WTC 7 suffering as-yet undetermined damage, or (2) the towers were intentionally brought down in a huge conspiracy involving literally hundreds of people, including presumably airport personnel in Boston, requiring months if not years of preparation for both the actual demolition and the elaborate terrorist cover story?

Wide ranging conspiracies like this simply don't exist, because the odds of someone talking or giving up a key piece of evidence inadvertantly increases exponentially with ever additional person brought into the fold.

Also, Oswald acted alone, dammit.

Bonus Quote:
Oswald was a fag.

Double Bonus Quote:
Ockham's Razor. You ever heard of it?

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-07-2005, 04:01 AM
Wednesday's:

fallacy

-dictionary.com:

1. A false notion.
2. A statement or an argument based on a false or invalid reference.
3. Incorrectness of reasoning or belief; erroneousness.
4. The quality of being deceptive.

-Wikipedia.org:

The term fallacy denotes any mistaken statement used in an argument. In logic, it specifically means an argument that violates the rules of formal demonstration. Beginning with Aristotle, fallacies have generally been placed in one of three categories: a material fallacy (misstatement of facts), a verbal fallacy (improper use of words), or a logical fallacy (also called a formal fallacy -- a mistake in the process of inference). The latter two fallacies are called fallacies in dictione (L. in delivery) or in voce (L. in expression), as opposed to material fallacies in re (L. in fact/cause/property) or extra dictionem (outside of/beside delivery).

Recognizing fallacies in practical arguments may be difficult since arguments are often structured using rhetorical patterns that obscure the logical connections between assertions.

-Wordnet 2.0:

1. fallacy, false belief -- (a misconception resulting from incorrect reasoning)

Hyponyms of noun fallacy:

>pseudoscience -- (an activity resembling science but based upon false assumptions)
>logical fallacy -- (a fallacy in logical augmentation)
>pathetic fallacy -- (the fallacy of attributing human feelings to inanimate objects)
>sophism, sophistry, sophistication -- (a deliberately invalid argument displaying ingenuity in reasoning in the hope of deceiving someone)
>paralogism -- (an unintentionally invalid argument)

-links:

> http://www.goodart.org/fallazoo.htm
> http://www.fallacyfiles.org/
> http://fallacyrock.com/

-Wordcount ranking: 19830 (between egf and graft)


All you did there was say what i said in different words and then pat your self on the back while you rail at me for not backing my own argument. Im not sure if thats a fallacy but it defiantly should be.

-Amanpour

Matthew Gallant
07-07-2005, 05:29 AM
That is defiantly a great quote.

DrCrypt
07-07-2005, 05:57 AM
Matthew, remember: it's not a misspelling if it accidentally spells another genera of word!

Christien Murawski
07-08-2005, 02:55 AM
Thursday's:

bollocking

-Compact Oxford English Dictionary:

Brit. vulgar slang a severe reprimand.

-encarta.msn.com:

U.K. a highly offensive term for a severe scolding (taboo)

-Dublin Slang Dictionary (http://homepage.tinet.ie/~nobyrne/b.htm):

Scolding: to "give out" to someone.

-Cambridge Dictionaries Online:

angry words spoken to someone who has done something wrong.

>Derivitaves: bollock

-Wordnet 2.0:

noun

1. testis, testicle, orchis, ball, ballock, bollock, nut, egg -- (one of the two male reproductive glands that produce spermatozoa and secrete androgens)
2. bollocks, bullock, block -- (a pulley-block at the head of a topmast)

verb

1. botch, bumble, fumble, botch-up, muff, blow, flub, screw-up, ball up, spoil, muck up, bungle, fluff, bollix, bollix up, bollocks, bollucks up, bobble, mishandle, louse up, foul up, mess up, fuck up -- (make a mess of; destroy or ruin)

-Wikipedia.org:

Bollocks is a slang term meaning testicles in British English, but more often used figuratively. It is rarely used in the singular. It has come to mean rubbish or "Crap" or even used in a similar way to Bullshit, and this usage is intentional. One of its singular forms is used to describe the malfunction of an operation, or messing up something: "Dropping a Bollock."

Perhaps the best known international use of the term in this sense is in the title of a Sex Pistols album. Testimony in an resulting lawsuit over the "obscene" term demonstrated that in Old English the word referred to a priest, and could be used to mean "nonsense" (see Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols for details). This common usage of the word has come to prominence with the phrase "What a load of bollocks."

Another usage with the opposite meaning is the dog's bollocks, which fits in with several rhyming reduplications of positive meaning that were popular during the 1920's ("the bee's knees," "the cat's pajamas"). Another derivation of the meaning "something that is very good," it is based on the notion that a dog's bollocks must taste good, as they spend so much time licking them.

Bollocking refers to a severe telling off. For example, "The boss gave him a right bollocking." Rollicking is sometimes used in place of bollocking when use of the word would cause offense.

-Infoplease.com:

2. rubbish, nonsense, claptrap (often used interjectionally).

>Word before = bollix
>Word after = boll weevil

-Wordcount ranking: 71365 (between xcelerated and gleanings)


My boss just gave me a bollocking on the phone for daring to go home (I work in central london).

What a cunt.

Bonus Quote:

Bollocks to the Wellingtons. We'll tell him they had a farmer's conference and had a run on them.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-09-2005, 08:58 AM
Friday's:

onerous:

1. Troublesome or oppresive; burdensome.
2. Law. Entailing obligations that exceed advantages.
3. Telling a smoker to go to a private bar or go outside to smoke.
4. Telling a non-smoker to go to only non-smoking establishments, or just stay home and never go out to eat.

-Roget's II:

Requiring great or extreme bodily, mental, or spiritual strength: arduous, backbreaking, burdensome, demanding, difficult, effortful, exacting, exigent, formidable, hard, heavy, laborious, oppressive, rigorous, rough, severe, taxing, tough, trying, weighty.

[Personal Note: exigent is just a great word]

-Webster's 1828:

1. Burdensome; oppressive.
2. In Scot's Law, being for the advantage of both parties; as an onerous contract; opposed to gratuitous.

-Infoplease before/after words:

>Before = one-reeler
>After = oneself

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

c. 1400, from O.Fr. (h)onereus (14th c. Mod.Fr. onéreux), from L. onerosus, from onus (gen. oneris) "burden."

-Wordcount ranking: 17724


I am still, and have always, of the opinion that private bars (truly private; e.g. membership required) which allow smoking are just fine. Yes, it's a bit of an onerous burden to place on the smoker, but no more so than the burden placed on non-smokers currently.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-10-2005, 03:20 AM
Saturday's:

cretinous

-dictionary.com:

1. A person afflicted with cretinism.
2. Slang. An idiot.

-Wikipedia.org:

Cretinism is a congenital form of deficiency of thyroid hormones, retarding mental and physical growth.

A cretin is a person affected by cretinism. This term has come to be regarded as insulting in the general population, although it is appropriate within technical settings.

Cretinism results from thyroid hormone deficiency. Thyroid hormones have permissive growth effects on body tissues such as muscular and neuronal tissue. A person afflicted with cretinism has severe physical and mental retardation. Often times he/she will have the physical stature of a child, when in fact the person is much older. Other symptoms may include slurred speech and movement, a protruding abdomen, and waxy skin.

Cretin also means an idiot or ignorant peasant.

-Compact Oxford English Dictionary:

very stupid

-Roget's II:

cretin: Slang: One deficient in judgment and good sense: ass, fool, idiot, imbecile, jackass, mooncalf, moron, nincompoop, ninny, nitwit, simple, simpleton, softhead, tomfool. Informal: dope, gander, goose. Slang: ding-dong, dip, goof, jerk, nerd, schmo, schmuck, turkey.

[Personal Note: mooncalf? I'm disappointed that gullabull, ultra-maroon, and nincowpoop didn't make the list.]

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

cretin: 1779, from Fr. Alpine dialect crestin, "a dwarfed and deformed idiot," from V.L. *christianus "a Christian," a generic term for "anyone," but often with the sense of "poor fellow."

-The Jargon Lexicon:

Wrong, stupid, non-functional; very poorly designed. Also used pejoratively of people. See dread high-bit disease for an example. Synonyms: bletcherous, bagbiting, losing, brain-damaged.

-Links:

[PN: Okay. I didn't expect to find any real links outside of the usual definition links. I was wrong. When I look for links for wotd, the last thing I do is just type in the word as a url. So this is what we have for cretin (http://www.cretin.org/) for today. My apologies to the conservative friends of wotd.]
>There's also a school (http://www.cretin-derhamhall.org/) that dares call itself by the name Cretin.
>And, of course, a band (http://www.cretanic.com/). "We are Cretin --a grindcore band comprised of disgusting, lurching miscreants, bent on a total resurrection of the late 80's grind style."
>There's also something called a Cretin Tracker (http://www.scotlandsoftware.com/products/cretintracker/)...good luck with that.

-Wordcount ranking: 73676 (between fermat and leafleting)


I don't think it is exactly news to point out that Fox's on-screen talent is made up largely of cretinous assholes.

Bonus Quote from Yesterday:
I think it's the difference between:

"The developers are clearly cretinous morons"

and

"Clearly, this is the kind of work you would expect from a cretinous moron."

Double Bonus Quote:
Where is it, you little one-eyed cretin?

Triple Dog Bonus Quote:
I love those goofy bastards.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-11-2005, 01:40 AM
Sunday's:

albatross

1. Any of several large web-footed birds constituting the family Diomedeidae, chiefly of the oceans of the Southern Hemisphere, and having a hooked beak and long narrow wings.
2. a. A constant, worrisome burden.
b. An obstacle to success.

-Wikipedia.org:

The albatrosses (from Portuguese Alcatraz, a pelican) are seabirds in the family Diomedeidae, which is closely allied with the petrels. They were once commonly known as Gooney Birds or Goonie Birds.

It is a superstition among sailors that it is disastrous to shoot an albatross.

Albatross is also a figurative meaning for a hindrance or a handicap.

Albatross is also a golf term, meaning three strokes under par. (Obsolete name for a double eagle.)

Albatross is a song by Fleetwood Mac.

The song has become a metaphor for when a band becomes associated in the public imagination with a single song despite often having many strong songs in their catalogue. Famous examples include Nirvana ("Smells Like Teen Spirit") and "Seven Nation Army" by the White Stripes.

[Personal Note: I'm shocked, shocked I tell you, that Moby Dick was not mentioned in the Wikipedia entry. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" was, but no Moby Dick. What are we coming to?]

-Infoplease before/after words:

>Before = Albategnius
>After = Al-Battani

[PN: I have no idea.]

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

The entry here for albatross (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=albatross) is great, actually, but far too unweildy to retype. If you're interested in such things, follow the link.

-Links:

>Requisite albatross blog (http://www.albatross.org/journal/) site: "Thumbing our noses at the terrorists, my family spent a whole day at one of their Top Target Locations: Camp Snoopy at the Mall of America."
>Berkeley's Oldest Pub: http://www.albatrosspub.com/
>Some sort of anime image archive: http://albatross1.com/
>Insurance company: http://www.albatross-insurance.com/
>And, of course, a band: http://www.albatross.net/

[PN: For a word with some pretty hefty negative connotations, albatross sure has a lot of businesses named after it. I just love that an insurance company named themselves after it. Is there also a Black Cat Insurance?]

-Wordcount ranking: 34480 (between oscillating and valuers)


I wouldn't at all be surprised if this movie outgrosses Batman Begins because it's going to appeal to families far more than BB will. And the latter has a albatross named Schumacher hanging around the neck of its franchise.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-12-2005, 02:38 AM
Monday's:

simulacrum

-dictionary.com:

1. An image or representation.
2. An unreal or vague semblance.

-Wikipedia.org:

Simulacrum is a Latin word originally meaning a material object representing something (such as an idol representing a deity, or a painted still-life a bowl of fruit). By the 1800s it developed a sense of a "mere" image, an empty form devoid of spirit, and descended to a specious or fallow representation.

In the book Simulacra and Simulation (1981/1995), the French social theorist Jean Baudrillard gave the term a specific meaning in the context of semiotics, extended from its common one: a copy of a copy which has been so dissipated in its relation to the original that it can no longer be said to be a copy. The simulacrum, therefore, stands on its own as a copy without a model. For example, the cartoon Betty Boop was based on singer Helen Kane. Kane, however, rose to fame imitating Annette Hanshaw. Hanshaw and Kane have fallen into relative obscurity, while Betty Boop remains an icon of the flapper.

The online encyclopedia Wikipedia itself may be seen as a large-scale field experiment in the spread of simulacra. It is notable that many pages are littered with factoids about the meaning of words in the fictitious context of popular movies, video and role-playing games, usually derivative cliches in imitation of other fictions. This self-reliance would no doubt amuse Baudrillard. For instance the 1999 movie The Matrix explores the relationship between people and their simulacra; and in a further example of self-reference Neo, one of the lead characters from the movie, uses a hollowed out copy of Jean Baudrillard's Simulacra and Simulation as a secret store.

Simulacrum is also the name of one of the world's most popular podcasts, hosted by the enigmatic Chris Skinner, it blends intellectual irreverence with slander and vulgarity. It can be found at http://www.listentothestars.co.uk/ .

In Blade Runner, the androids are not copies of actual humans--all of whom, in the film, have physical defects--but of idealized, perfect versions of humans. Therefore, the replicants are imitations not of reality but of another imitation--ergo, they are simulacra.

The novel on which Blade Runner was based Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, was written by Philip K. Dick, whose novels often blended the lines between reality and its copies. Dick even published a book in 1969 called Simulacrum, which had a somewhat similar plot involving Androids.

-Roget's II:

Something closely resembling another: carbon copy, copy, duplicate, facsimile, image, likeness, reduplication, replica, replication, reproduction

-Links:

> Simulacra Magazine (http://www.specficworld.com/simulacrum.html)..."The Magazine of Speculative Transformation."
> blog (http://www.listentothestars.blogspot.com/). "This weekend, I lost the biggest table and chair in the world."
> requisite band (http://www.voiceovermusic.com/index2.htm).

-Wordcount ranking: 59055 (between greenside and aei).


Simulacrum Attack!

-Amanpour

700

Christien Murawski
07-13-2005, 03:08 AM
Tuesday's:

demagoguery

-dictionary.com:

The practices or rhetoric of a demagogue.

sub-definition: demagogue

1. A leader who obtains power by means of impassioned appeals to the emotions and prejudices of the populace.
2. A leader of the common people in ancient times.

-Wordnet 2.0:

demagoguery, demagogy -- (impassioned appeals to the prejudices and emotions of the populace)

-Wikipedia.org:

Demagogy is the set of methods used by demagogues. It is a strategy of obtaining power by appealing to the gut feelings of the public, usually by use of rhetoric and propaganda.

H.L.Mencken defined a demagogue as:
"one who preaches doctrines he knows to be untrue to men he knows to be idiots"

The word is nowadays used mostly as a political insult: political opponents are described as demagogues, but people we approve of are "men of the people," or great speechmakers.

Although, according to Mencken's definition, Demagogy involves lying, some would say it doesn't, since it doesn't use false facts directly, but rather brings the uncritical listener to draw the desired conclusion himself. Demagogy often involves logical fallacies, but has many aspects that have nothing to do with logic.

-Online Etymolgy Dictionary:

demagogue: 1648, from Gk. demagogos "leader of the people," from demos "people" + agogos "leader," from agein "to lead" (see act). A term of disparagement ever since ever since it was first used in Athens in, 5c. B.C.E.

-Band:

Welcome to the website of London-based Heavy Metal band Demagogue (http://www.thedemagogue.com/800%20x%20600/Home%20page.htm). Modern metal brewed in the choking, draining embrace of an increasingly apathetic culture.

[Personal Note: These blokes may need to chill out and rent a copy of Brassed Off for hints on how to musically deal with the draining embrace of blah blah blah.]

-Wordcount ranking (demagogue): 63975 (just slightly more popular than the letter 'Z')


Damn, and that bit about Rove's demagoguery in Alabama is from one of his staffers? What a shitty thing to do. Isn't that sort of character assasination illegal?

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-14-2005, 02:45 AM
Wednesday's:

chimeras

-dictionary.com:

1. a. An organism, organ, or part consisting of two or more tissues of different genetic composition, produced as a result of organ transplant, grafting, or genetic engineering.
b. A substance, such as an antibody, created from the proteins or genes of two different species.
2. An individual who has received a transplant of genetically and immunologically different tissue.
3. A fanciful mental illusion or fabrication.

-Wikipedia.org:

In Greek Mythology, the Chimera is a monstrous creature made of the parts of multiple animals.

The term "chimera" or "chimeric" is often used metaphorically to describe things that have combined attributes from different sources. In genetics, for example, an organ or tissue created from two or more genetic sources is called chimeric, as in transplant patients with organs from other donors. Most other usages are related to this metaphor.

The word chimera is also generally accepted to mean an unreal ambition, a fanciful scheme, or even a castle in the air. This is in clear contrast with its old meaning of a bogey or an irrational fear.

[PN: Oh, and it's also apparently the name of an Imperial Star Destroyer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chimaera_%28Star_Wars%29).]

-Wordcount ranking: 37013 (between seamer and showering)


Chimeras? Holy Full Metal Alchemist, Batman.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-15-2005, 02:48 AM
Thursday's:

egalitarian

-dictionary.com:

Affirming, promoting, or characterized by belief in equal political, economic, social, and civil rights for all people.

-Wordnet 2.0:

(n) egalitarian, equalitarian -- (a person who believes in the equality of all people)

(adj) classless, egalitarian -- (favoring social equality) "a classless society"

-Wordcount ranking: 15772


Kronos also grabs female enemies and snaps their necks, so he's an egalitarian chap. Whatever the women want is his credo!

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-16-2005, 02:32 AM
Friday's:

excoriating

-dictionary.com:

(excoriate)
1. To tear or wear off the skin of; abrade: See Synonyms at chafe.
2. To censure strongly; denounce: an editorial that excoriated the administration for its inaction.

-Wikipedia.org:

An excoriation is an erosion or destruction of the skin by mechanical insult like a scratch or abrasion of the skin. This can happen quickly like with a scratch or slowly with rubbing. It's commonly seen in other skin disorders causing itching/pruritis: dry skin, dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, scabies, etc. It can been a symptom of other illnesses like liver failure where pruritis is caused by increases of bilirubin.

-Cambridge Dictionaries Online:

(excoriate)
To state the opinion that a play, a book, a political action, etc. is very bad.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

(excoriate)
1447 (implied in excoriation), from L.L. excoriatus, pp. of excoriare "flay, strip off the hide," from L. ex- "off" + corium "hide, skin." Figurative sense of "denounce, censure" first recorded in Eng. 1708.

-Wordcount ranking: not in archive


That's the only interpretation that makes sense. He didn't just blurt out some fact that would seem to exonerate Rove; he was once again excoriating Novak for burning his wife. It would have been much clearer if he had said "My wife was no longer a clandestine officer the moment that Bob Novak blew her identity," but people screw up when they talk to the press.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-17-2005, 11:26 PM
Saturday's:

Illuminati

-dictionary.com:

1. illuminati People claiming to be unusually enlightened with regard to a subject.
2. Illuminati Any of various groups claiming special religious enlightenment.

-Wikipedia.org:

The Illuminati is the name of many groups, modern and historical, real and fictitious, verified and alleged. Most commonly, however, The Illuminati refers specifically to the Bavarian Illuminati, the least secret of all secret societies in the world. Most alleged use refers to a shadowy conspiratorial organization which controls world affairs behind the scenes, usually a modern incarnation or continuation of the Bavarian Illuminati. Illuminati is sometimes synonymous with New World Order.

The Bavarian Illuminati...History:

A short-lived movement of republican freethinkers, the most radical offshoot of The Enlightenment -- to whose adherents the name Illuminati was given (but who called themselves "Perfectibilists") -- was founded on May 1, 1776 by the ex-Jesuit Adam Weishaupt (d. 1830) professor of canon law, and Baron Adolph von Knigge, Ingolstadt, Bavaria (now Germany). The group has been called the Illuminati Order, the Order of the Illuminati, and the Bavarian Illuminati.

-Webster's 1828:

A church term anciently applied to persons who had received baptism; in which ceremony they received a lighted taper, as a symbol of the faith and grace they had received by that sacrament.

1. The name of a sect of heretics, who sprung up in Spain about the year 1575, and who afterward appeared in France. Their principle doctrine was, that by means of a sublime manner of prayer, they had attained to so perfect a state as to have no need of ordinances, sacraments, and good works.

2. The name given to certain associations of men in modern Europe, who combined to overthrow the existing religious institutions, and subsitute reason, by which they expected to raise men and society to perfection.


He must be apart of teh Illuminati. I agree.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-17-2005, 11:52 PM
Sunday's:

moribund

-dictionary.com:

1. Approaching death; about to die.
2. On the verge of becoming obsolete: moribund customs; a moribund way of life.

-Compact Oxford English Dictionary:

1. at the point of death.
2. in terminal decline; lacking vigor.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1721, "about to die," from Fr. moribund (16c.), from L. moribundus "dying," from mori "to die" (see mortal). Fig. sense of "near an end" is from 1837.

-Infoplease before/after words:

>Before = Moriah
>After = Mörike

[Personal Note: I like these today. Kind of dovetails nicely. Kind of.]

-Links:

> I think this is a band (http://www.moribundcult.com/) but I'm not delving into it because I'm on my wife's work machine right now. On the other hand, it has far too many exclamation points on the intro page for people who invoke Satan. "Subjugating the Infidels of christ since 1993!!" Also: "You are about to enter the Extreme Satanic Stronghold of the Moribund Cult: If Devilish Imagery, strong language or independent thought offend you please leave this page now. We will not be held liable for the Demons that will possess you, or their affects (psychological or physical) if you do not heed this warning and proceed further!"

[PN: The rest of the links all seem to lead to the lyrics of that Peter Gabriel song.]

-Wordcount ranking: 27152 (between [i]egalitarianism and gotten)


Comics are, for the most part, totally moribund from a creative standpoint.

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-19-2005, 12:51 AM
Monday's:

pikers

-dictionary.com:

1. A cautious gambler.
2. A person regarded as petty or stingy.

-Wikipedia.org:

A piker is a person who bets or gambles with small amounts of money; a cheapskate.

In more modern, Internet parlance, a piker is someone who writes short and often seemingly irrelevant messages or posts on an internet forum or message board, generally for the sole purpose of increasing the individual's post count. This practice is largely frowned upon by most moderators and message board communities. [Personal Note: Uh-oh.]

Modern Australian slang. Someone who is invited to an event or outing, who confirms their forthcoming engagement but never actually attends. Also, one who attends an event but leaves early in the proceedings. ie. You're not piking already are you?

New Zealand Slang: someone who gives up easily, a slacker.

Also: a shirker. Avoiding one's fair share.

Also: a college freshman. [See Cornell University's Fight Song (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Give_My_Regards_to_Davy).]

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

"miserly person," 1872, formerly "poor migrant to California" (1860), earlier pike (1854), perhaps originally "vagrant who wanders the pike (1)" (which is the notion in Sussex dial. piker "vagrant, tramp, gypsy," 1838), but Barnhart and others say the Amer.Eng. word ultimately is a reference to people from Pike County, Missouri.

-Links:

>Scrap all of the above. I'm sure what the poster is referring to is these guys (http://www.rescomp.wustl.edu/~pikers/home.html).
>Or maybe this guy (http://www.southportsports.com/pike.shtml). [PN: which leads me to realize that all of the above definitions leave out "one who fishes for pike."]
>I find this to be weird: http://www.pikers.com/
>Piker's Peak (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050844/): "In the Alps, Bugs and Yosemite Sam vie for 50,000 Cronkites, the prize for the first one who "climbs the Schmatterhorn." [PN: This reminds me, I've got to get those Looney Tunes Golden dvd collections.]

-No Wordcount ranking for either singular or plural form.


Compared to the Duke team tho, Valve are pikers at missing dates:

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-20-2005, 12:56 AM
Tuesday's:

schism

-dictionary.com:

1. A separation or division into factions.
2. a. A formal breach of union within a Christian church.
b. The offense of attempting to produce such a breach.
3. Disunion; discord.

-Cambridge Dictionaries Online:

a division into two groups caused by a disagreement about ideas, especially in a religious organization.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

1382, scisme, "dissention within the church," from O.Fr. cisme "a cleft, split," from L.L. schisma, from Gk. skhisma (gen. skhismatos) "division, cleft," from stem of skhizein "to split" (see shed (v.)). Spelling restored 16c., but pronunciation unchanged. Often in reference to the Great Schism (1378-1417) in the Western Church. Schismatic (n.) is attested from 1377.

-Roget's II:

1. An interruption in friendly relations: alienation, breach, break, disaffection, estrangement, fissure, rent, rip, rupture, split. 2. A state of disagreement and disharmony: clash, conflict, confrontation, contention, difference, difficulty, disaccord, discord, discordance, dissention, dissent, etc...

-Links:

>An online comic (http://schism.org/)
>A game supplement (http://memento-mori.com/schism/) or something. "For the mind-scarred, there is no freedom. No release. Only pain and death. For them. For you." For V-ger.
> http://www.schism.ca/ : I don't know. A blog maybe?
>Tool lyrics (http://www.lyricsondemand.com/t/toollyrics/schismlyrics.html)
>More comics: http://www.schismcomics.com/

-Wordcount ranking: 27577 (between perforated and cashmere)


Just part of the overall schism I noticed between 30+ and under-30 convention-goers.

I walked around in a stupid costume Saturday, but it was pretty oldschool, so only people over 30 noticed it (that schism again).

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-21-2005, 10:15 PM
Wednesday's:

pithy

-dictionary.com:

1. Precisely meaningful; forceful and brief: a pithy comment.
2. Consisting of or resembling pith.

>sub-definition: pith

n.
1. Botany. The soft, spongelike central cylinder of the stems of most flowering plants, composed mainly of parenchyma.
2. Zoology. The soft inner substance of a feather or hair.
3. The essential or central part; the heart or essence.
4. Strength; vigor; mettle.
5. Significance; importance.
6. Archaic. Spinal cord or bone marrow.

tr. v.
1. To remove the pith from (a plant stem).
2. To sever or destroy the spinal cord of, usually by inserting a needle into the vertebral column.
3. To kill (cattle) by cutting the spinal cord.

-Webster's 1828:

pithy: Consisting of pith; containing pith; abounding with pith; as a pithy substance; a pithy stem. [...a tremendous amount of pith...I'm dead and they're talking about pith. Question is, have I learned anything?]

1. Containing concentrated force; forcible; energetic; as a pithy word or expression.

2. Uttering energetic words or expressions.

-Online Etymology Dictionary:

[PN: lots of stuff in the entry for pith, but this is what I liked best:]

Pith Helmet (1889, earlier pith hat, 1884) so called because it is made from the dried pith of the Bengal spongewood.

-Wordcount ranking: 36247


I kind of like "General System Error: 190037" myself. Short, pithy, and to the point. Has no useful denotation at all...

Bonus Quote:

And I like the way you express yourself too, y'know, it's pithy yet degenerate. You get many dates?

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-22-2005, 01:17 AM
Thursday's:

sandbagging

-dictionary.com:

1. To put sandbags in or around.
2. To hit with a sandbag.
3. Slang
a. To treat severely or unjustly.
b. To force by crude means; coerce: sandbagging us into cleaning up their mess.
c. To downplay or misrepresent one's ability in a game or activity in order to deceive (someone), especially in gambling: sandbagging the pool player by playing poorly in the first game when the stakes were low.

-Wikipedia.org:

Sandbagging is the practice of deceptively portraying oneself as being in a weaker position than true. For instance:

Sandbagging is a drag racing technique. Sandbagging is a term used in drag racing when a racer has a dial-in time much slower than the car can actually perform. The function of sandbagging is to guarantee a win by outperforming the slower opponent at first, and then hitting the brakes near the finish line in time to just barely beat the opponent. However, sandbaggers run the risk of actually beating their dial-in time, thus disqualifying them from the race. Sandbaggers must be experienced in controlling this technique, and therefore, it should not be attempted by beginners. Sandbagging faces much criticism, as many argue it is essentially cheating.

Sandbagging is a poker play. Sandbagging (also called slow-play) is a deceptive play in poker that is roughly the opposite of bluffing: betting weakly with a strong holding rather than betting strongly with a weak one. The check-raise is such a play.

-Links:

> I don't know what I expected, but it wasn't this (http://www.sandbagging.org/) weird page. "This is my site. You've probably seen a couple of these before, but this is going to be a site about why I like some things and why I don't like other things." Be sure to click on the "Why People Are Dumb" link. Ah, the Internets.
>Useful if you live in a flood zone: http://www.fremontcounty.org/sandbagging.htm

-No wordcount ranking for sandbagging (however, sandbag is ranked 64013)


That said, and admittedly only after watching one episode, I'm afraid that sandbagging will be a major, major problem for this show in the future. Last night's episode was evidence of this; the guy who won was clearly backing off in the second race event, made obvious by the huge gap he opened up in the third race (using nearly the exact same starting position). I can't blame the guy who lost (I'm sorry, I can't recall the names) for being a sore loser last night; he clearly got jobbed by that smirking, sandbagging jackball.

Bonus Quote:

But man, sandbagging or no, that's all a part of contesting the show.

Double Bonus Quote:

That bastard isn't gonna get away with this. I mean, what is going on in this country when a scumsucker like that can get away with sandbagging a doctor of journalism?

-Amanpour

Christien Murawski
07-23-2005, 03:37 AM
Friday's:

peloton

-Webster's New Millenium Dictionary of English:

1. A small ball or pellet.
2. A small military group; platoon.

-Wikipedia.org:

The peloton (from French, literally meaning ball and related to the English word platoon) or bunch is the large main group in a road bicycle race. Riders in a group save energy by riding close (drafting or slipstreaming) near (particularly behind) other riders. The peloton travels as an integrated unit, like birds flying in formation, each rider making slight adjustments in response to the riders around them (particularly to the one in front of each).

More loosely, "the peloton" can also refer to professional cyclists in general: "LeMond joined the European peloton at a time when few Americans could."

Merriam-Webster's Dictionary announced "Peloton" as the seventh place finisher for the Top Ten words of the year in 2004.

-Compact Oxford English Dictionary:

main group of cyclists in a race

-Infoplease.com:

an ornamental glass made in Bohemia in the late 19th century, usually having a striated overlay of glass filaments in a different color. Also called peloton glass.

>word before = Pelotas
>word after = pelt

-Hickock Sports Glossaries:

The field.

-Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Glossary:

A densely packed group of riders, sheltering in each others' draft. In a mass-start race, most of the competitors usually end up in one large peloton for most of the race. The word is French, from a term that means rolled up in a ball...a related word, peloter, means to caress sensually, cuddle.

-Links:

> Pro Cycling News (http://www.dailypeloton.com/default.asp)
> More: http://secretsofthepeloton.com/
> The Peloton Project (http://www.laf.org/site/c.beIKLOOrGpF/b.485099/k.A396/Peloton_Project.htm) : Lance Armstrong Foundation.
> Peloton Blog (http://peloton.blogs.com/)
> bandish thing (http://www.popmatters.com/music/reviews/d/delgados-peloton.shtml) : "If you're wondering where the next hot music scene will be, the answer may well be Scotland."

-Wordcount ranking: 63556 (between nationalisms and kreuzberg)


As a result, the peloton generally rides conservatively and below the theoretical optimal sustainable speed of a lot of riders.

Bonus Quote:

If someone attempts to break that can threaten the Yellow Jersey, then his team will generally attempt to lead the peloton and up the pace to wheel in the breakaway group. Conversely the teammates of people in the breakaway group might try to head the peloton to slow it down.

Double Bonus Quote:

Lots of the dynamics of a big bike race (breakaways, etc.) are psychological as well as physiological. If you have a team member in a break-away, that person can work to keep it from getting too far ahead of the peloton, by dogging it slightly when it's his turn to lead.

Triple Dog Bonus Quote:

Trivia: If there are stragglers behind the Peloton they're sometimes called Le Autobus

Quattro:

Last year, the team dominated the peloton from the front and suffocated anyone who tried to muscle their way in or through.

-Amanpour

Ben Sones
07-23-2005, 06:44 AM
I thought a peloton was one of those birds with the really big bill.

Rywill
07-23-2005, 08:04 AM
That's a pakistan.