The Guardian raises the issue of breast physics based on the laughable sway in the above scene from Ryse, the Xbox One swords-and-sandals launch title. Dom Clubb, an UK artist for a free-to-play iOS game, suggests the bad physics might have been a factor of rushed development.

A character mesh is made up of thousands of vertices. When the physics system is applied, each vertex is given a value — lets say 0-1 — depending on how much the artist wants the particular vertex to be affected by physics. This will make the cloth vertices sway and the flesh vertices stay rigid. But because Ryse was probably rushed to make the Xbox One launch, I’m guessing the character was given a single physics system for the whole mesh rather than one for skin and a separate one for cloth. If you were to do the physics properly, there are lots of parameters to deal with, like stiffness, sway and stretch, and the cloth on the breasts would have to deform separately. That would have been a computational nightmare.

That’s pretty charitable. I’m sure the gore in Ryse was also a computational nightmare, but one the developer thought was worth calculating. Like pretty much everything else in videogame development, you do whatever you have time to do. I suspect developer Crytek doesn’t care much about its breasts, or it just assumes its playerbase wouldn’t know how a real breast moves.

What stands out, so to speak, is the state of undress of whoever that chick is, which makes that scene all about the breast physics. If you can’t do it right, Crytek, cover it up. The worst kind of cheesecake is bad cheesecake.