Archive for April 19th, 2013

, | Game reviews

who's_laughing_now

“Well is it better than Marvel vs Capcom?” my friend eventually asked. He had started off asking me, “So how is Injustice?” But until I’ve played enough to write a review, I never know how to answer so open a question. So I just stammered noncommittally. But with his more pointed question, I was suddenly floored. I’d certainly thought a lot about Marvel vs Capcom while learning and playing Injustice, and obviously the developers at NetherRealm have thought about it as well. But I hadn’t yet considered the simple matter of which is the better game.

I have a strange complex relationship with the Marvel vs Capcom series. Marvel vs Capcom 3 was both one of my favorite and most disappointing games of 2011, mostly because I liked it as much as I did and Capcom Capcommed it as much as they did. It taught me a lot about fighting games, including how to actually play them. After all these years, that was the game that truly introduced me to the genre.

But given the choice, would I rather play Injustice: Gods Among Us or Marvel vs Capcom 3? And why?

After the jump, who wins in a fight between The Avengers and Batman? Continue reading →

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, | Games

getting_higher

Today’s update for God of War Ascension, a surprisingly good multiplayer game, just raised the level cap from 30 to 40. To really appreciate what this means, you have to understand that any given character actually has four levels, one for each of the gods, who are the functional equivalent of character classes. So whereas you used to have 120 levels to earn, now you have 160. Furthermore, these levels also unlock new rewards for each of the four gods, including a new item (i.e. four new items), two new relics that give you passive powers (i.e. eight new relics), and an “ultimate magic” (i.e. four “ultimate magics”). With Ascension, Sony did a great job keeping God of War relevant, and this is exactly the sort of post-release support that keeps on keeping it relevant.

Also, double xp weekend in effect, y’all!

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, | Games

curious

Peter Molyneux is either an inspired genius, an impractical dreamer, or a gifted con artist depending on who you ask. His game Curiosity – What’s Inside the Cube? launched in November 2012 and asked players around the world to cooperate at chippping away bits of a virtual cube to uncover the “life-changingly amazing” secret in the center. This is done by tapping at “cubelets” one at a time. Since the cube is made of billions of cubelets, the task would seem to be a daunting one. Luckily, the game allows players to purchase special tools and abilites with real money to increase their mining ability.

Molyneux, and his development company 22Cans, has always maintained that Curiosity is a social as well as a financial experiment and the newest feature added to the game reinforces that. Players can now buy blocks of cublets to add back to the total. For $0.99, you can return 10K cublets back to the cube and annoy some people. For $6.99, you can negate 100K cublets of work and make some players angry. For $10.99, you can add back a whopping 500K cubelets and really mess with the game.

As part of the experiment we are also offering the opportunity for those keen to preserve the experience to add back cubelets at the start of a layer. We don’t know what will happen in this war of attrition.

Molyneux, you magnificent bastard! I never want to play this game, but I eagerly await the outcome.

Curiosity is available on iOS as well as Android systems.

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, | Games

therethere1

Now we know what those mysterious Vine videos from Bethesda were about. IGN has the exclusive announcement trailer for The Evil Within, a survival horror game from Shinji Mikami, creator of the Resident Evil series, and Tango Gameworks. Unfortunately, it’s a live-action trailer, so there’s not much information on the actual game yet. Still, for everyone saddened by the recent action-heavy direction of the Resident Evil games from Capcom, perhaps now there’s hope for some good scares.

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