Archive for March 30th, 2012

, | Games

The various sprite packs Paradox has been selling for their games — basically skins for the units — is one thing. That stuff is silly and if anyone wants to buy it, he and his money deserve to be parted. But charging for basic personalization options? It’s not unlike THQ charging you for cheat codes in Saints Row 3.

With the new Crusader Kings II: Ruler Designer DLC all these are in your hands. Customize your character your way. Tweak and change any aspect of the character or even create an all new character and dynasty to play with. Create your portrait, change the name and dynasty and even customize your coat of arms. Change traits and stats at will and decide the size of the immediate family. The game that lets you choose your goals will now let you choose your character.

In my day, we could name our dudes in X-Com whatever we wanted and we didn’t have to pay $5! If I want to do things to customize my experience in a game, I shouldn’t have to pay extra. DLC should be content, not options that already belong in the core game.

The Ruler Designer will be available for $5 in a few weeks. Don’t buy it. You’re just encouraging them.

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, | Game diaries

No one is trying to sell me content when I play Xenoblade Chronicles on my Wii. There are no retail exclusives and even if there were, there is no place to enter a code to activate them. There will be no DLC. No one is going to vaguely promise to change the ending. No one is going to sell me a new gun or add skins for Sera or Garrus or Magneto. It’s almost enough to make me not mind spending literally dozens of hours on my Wii playing a single game.

After the jump, the character that would have been DLC Continue reading →

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, | Game diaries

There’s no undo button in Unity of Command. If I move a unit accidentally, I can’t take it back.
The developers say they’re working to add this feature. In the meantime, I can always redo the
scenario. I’m starting to understand how that’s part of the appeal.

After the jump, wargaming’s relationship with history Continue reading →

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